Support La Quadrature du Net!

copyright

EU Council Presidency: Spain pushes for flawed Net policies

Last week, the Spanish Presidency of the EU Council came up with a new draft resolution1 in response to the Commission's communication on enhancing the enforcement of intellectual property rights (IPR) in the internal market.

[Update - March 5th, 2010: The resolution has been adopted by the Council with no significant changes.]

Questions to Commissioner-designate Kroes on Net neutrality and freedoms in the digital age

La Quadrature du Net sent this letter to the members of the ITRE and CULT committees of the European Parliament to urge them to ask the following questions to Mrs. Kroes, Commissioner-designate for the Digital Agenda, during her hearing on Thursday, January 14th.

Future of copyright: La Quadrature calls on the Commission to reassert the public's rights

La Quadrature du Net has submitted its response to the European Commission's consultation regarding "Online Creative Content". La Quadrature calls on the Commission to reconsider the EU's coercive and repressive copyright policies, while encouraging it to match words to deeds by fostering the rights of the public in the digital creative ecosystem.

Download "Creative Content in the Digital Age: Reasserting the Rights of the Public" in PDF.

European Copyright Reform: A New Directive Against Fundamental Freedoms

Paris, 11 September 2017 — NGOs are no longer alone to claim that the draft of the new European Copyright Directive, currently discussed by the European Parliament, contains prejudicial provisions regarding fundamentals rights and freedoms. Six member states sent observations to the EU Council to bring its attention to the dangers some measures could entail, in particular an obligation to automatically filter the platforms. As a significant vote on the text draws near in September, it is important that citizens mobilise and that we draw the right conclusions from this latest repressive drift.

Copyright in France: Wishful Thinking and Real Dangers

Paris, 13 May 2013 — Pierre Lescure has handed in his report [fr] on culture at the digital era to French President François Hollande1. La Quadrature du Net denounces a flawed political process revealing the harmful influence of industrial groups at all levels of policy-making. How will the French government react to Lescure's proposal to expand the scope of competence of the audiovisual media regulator (CSA) to the Internet? Will it to pursue former President Sarkozy's anti-sharing policies and even supplement them with new ACTA-like measures encouraging online intermediaries to become private copyright police?

  • 1. Pierre Lescure lead a committee advising the French government on the future of copyright law Hadopi, the French "three strikes" administration.

Culture and the Internet: the report

Paris, 10 May 2013 — The publication of the report on culture and the Internet requested by French president Hollande to Pierre Lescure – former CEO of Canal +, a major TV station owned by Vivendi-Universal – will be the object of a major media buzz in France. For those interested in what would be ambitious public policies adapted to the digital era, La Quadrature du Net brings back on the table its Elements for the reform of copyright and related cultural policies. Will those 14 propositions, attentive to the freedoms and uses of everyone, to the interests of authors and other contributors, be a part of it, or will the Lescure report perpetuate the repressive policies led by Nicolas Sarkozy?

Aaron Swartz on Sharing

Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves (...). Meanwhile, those who have been locked out are not standing idly by. You have been sneaking through holes and climbing over fences, liberating the information locked up by the publishers and sharing them with your friends. But all of this action goes on in the dark, hidden underground. It’s called stealing or piracy, as if sharing a wealth of knowledge were the moral equivalent of plundering a ship and murdering its crew. But sharing isn’t immoral — it’s a moral imperative.

Elements for the reform of copyright and related cultural policies

Now that the ACTA treaty has been rejected by the European Parliament, a period opens during which it will be possible to push for a new regulatory and policy framework adapted to the digital era. Many citizens and MEPs support the idea of reforming copyright in order to make possible for all to draw the benefits of the digital environment, engage into creative and expressive activities and share in their results. In the coming months and years, the key questions will be: What are the real challenges that this reform should address? How can we address them?

This text provides an answer to the first question and tables a consistent set of proposals to tackle the second one. It is available in English, French, and Spanish. The proposals address copyright reform as well as related culture and media policy issues. These elements are intended for being used by reform proponents according to their own orientations. One will have to consider nonetheless the interdependency between various proposals. This text was drafted by Philippe Aigrain, with contributions from Lionel Maurel and Silvère Mercier and was critically reviewed by the co-founders and staff of La Quadrature du Net. It is published in parallel on the author's blog and on La Quadrature du Net's site.

This text is open to any comments. You can add your own reflections or questions here.

Infographic Remix: ACTA, Lethal Weapon Against your Rights!

The fantastic folks from DerechoALeer.org designed this wonderful mash-up between two videos from La Quadrature: “RoboCopyright ACTA” (for the graphics) and “NO to ACTA” (for the text)! Thanks so much Juan! ♡

Internet censorship against streaming in France?

Paris, December 1st, 2011 – Several French trade associations representing producers, publishers and video distributors are filing for an injunction against Internet Service Providers and several online platforms, requesting access be censored to several websites offering audiovisual works streaming.1.

Private Copying: French Parliament Downsizes The Public's Rights

Paris, November 23rd, 2011 – Members of the French Parliament are using a bill on private copying levy as an occasion to kill the copyright exception for private copying. Under the pretense of saving royalties collection, MPs have redefined fair use in the process. Giving in once more to pressure from the recording and movie industry, the French Parliament carries on Nicolas Sarkozy's repressive policy against the Internet and new cultural practices.

In Defense of Free Culture in Brazil

La Quadrature reproduces an open letter by the Brazilian civil society (dates December 28th, 2010). Many Brazilians worry that the ongoing changes at the Ministry of Culture will jeopardize the progressive policies put in place by Gilberto Gil, when he was head of the Ministry (2003-2008) and its successor Juca Ferreira (2008-2011).

La Quadrature's Take on the Digitization of Our Cultural Heritage

La Quadrature du Net answered the consultation of the Reflection Group set up by the European Commission to make proposals on "how best to foster the online presence of our cultural heritage".

EU liberals join Sarkozysts in online repression

Paris, September 16th 2010 - The Gallo report on copyright enforcement -from the pro-Sarkozy MEP, Marielle Gallo- will be voted on Wednesday, September 22nd in the European Parliament. Surprisingly, the Liberal ALDE group has tabled its own alternative resolution, a bad and almost equally repressive text. Under blatant influence of the producers and publishers' lobbies, this political move from the liberals actually aims at facilitating the vote of the original Gallo report.

Syndicate content