Revue de presse

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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[EconomicTimes] A lucky accident: Net neutrality changed the world for the better, let's keep it that way

The concept of network neutrality was unplanned, an accident even, but a lucky one that did more to encourage internet innovation. [...]

Net neutrality was born not through any conscious design, but because the internet was incapable of being anything but neutral. This best-effort nature of the early internet's design, however, did have a profound effect on competition and innovation within the internet. [...]

Google, Facebook and other companies succeeded because the network neither hindered them nor helped their competition. [...]

Central to today's debate is the effort by ISPs to undermine net neutrality in order to make more money than they can do by simply transmitting packets. [...]

Network neutrality has served as a platform where companies compete based on ideas, and no competitive advantage is provided to anyone based on either quality of service or pricing. It should remain that way. [...]

[DutchNews] KPN joins criticism of Dutch government's new phone tap rules

Former state monopoly KPN has become the latest organisation to slam the government’s plans to give far greater powers to the security services to tap phone and internet traffic. […]

KPN said the new rules conflict with the right to privacy in communication as laid down in the Dutch constitution and will prove very expensive to implement. It also pointed to the lack of legal controls on mass surveillance. […]

British privacy watchdog Privacy International has already described the proposals as among the most far-reaching in the world and says they will provide a poor example for companies without strong democratic traditions.

‘We would strongly urge the Dutch government not to expand surveillance beyond what is necessary and reasonable in a democratic society’, the organisation said.

[AlJazeera] Vice News fixer 'charged over encryption software'

Three staff members from Vice News were charged with "aiding an armed organisation" because one of the men was using an encryption system on his personal computer which is often used by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), a senior press official in the Turkish government has told Al Jazeera. […]

On Monday, the three men were charged by a Turkish judge in Diyarbakir with "deliberately aiding an armed organisation", the driver was released without charge. [...]

In Brussels, EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said on Tuesday: "Any country negotiating EU accession needs to guarantee the respect for human rights, including freedom of expression." [...]

[Zeit] XKeyscore: A Dubious Deal with the NSA

Internal documents show that Germany's domestic intelligence agency, the BfV, received the coveted software program XKeyscore from the NSA – and promised data from Germany in return. [...]

Politically and legally, however, the accord is extremely delicate. Nobody outside of the BfV oversees what data is sent to the NSA in accordance with the "Terms of Reference," a situation that remains unchanged today. Neither Germany’s data protection commissioner nor the Parliamentary Control Panel, which is responsible for oversight of the BfV, has been fully informed about the deal. [...]

[TheGuardian] Digital surveillance 'worse than Orwell', says new UN privacy chief

Joseph Cannataci describes British oversight as ‘a joke’ and says a Geneva convention for the internet is needed [...]

The appointment of a UN special rapporteur on privacy is seen as hugely important because it elevates the right to privacy in the digital age to that of other human rights. As the first person in the job, the investigator will be able to set the standard for the digital right to privacy, deciding how far to push governments that want to conduct surveillance for security reasons, and corporations who mine us for our personal data. [...]

“[The Snowden revelations] were very important. Snowden will continue to be looked upon as a traitor by some and a hero by others. But in actual fact his revelations confirmed to many of us who have been working in this field for a long time what has been going on, and the extent to which it has gone out of control.” [...]

We have a number of corporations that have set up a business model that is bringing in hundreds of thousands of millions of euros and dollars every year and they didn’t ask anybody’s permission. They didn’t go out and say: ‘Oh, we’d like to have a licensing law.’ No, they just went out and created a model where people’s data has become the new currency. And unfortunately, the vast bulk of people sign their rights away without knowing or thinking too much about it,” he said.

[TorrentFreak] Court Orders 20 Big Piracy Sites Blocked in Denmark

Following a complaint filed by anti-piracy group Rights Alliance, 20 leading 'pirate' sites will soon be blocked in Denmark. The blocking order, handed down yesterday by a district court, will be respected by the country's leading ISPs following the signing of a piracy code of conduct in 2014. [...]

According to many of the world’s leading anti-piracy groups, site blocking is one of the most effective tools when it comes to reducing instances of online piracy. It’s a technique employed in a growing list of countries around the world, in Europe in particular. [...]

After obtaining an order from the District Court in Frederiksberg yesterday, an additional 20 piracy sites will now be blocked at the ISP level. [...]

And for Danish users, the blocking won’t stop here. Maria Fredenslund [CEO of Right Alliance, NdlR] says that the effort will continue for as long as the anti-piracy group views it as an effective tool to combat infringement. [...]

[NYTimes] AT&T Helped U.S. Spy on Internet on a Vast Scale

The National Security Agency’s ability to spy on vast quantities of Internet traffic passing through the United States has relied on its extraordinary, decades-long partnership with a single company: the telecom giant AT&T. [...]

AT&T’s cooperation has involved a broad range of classified activities, according to the documents, which date from 2003 to 2013. AT&T has given the N.S.A. access, through several methods covered under different legal rules, to billions of emails as they have flowed across its domestic networks. It provided technical assistance in carrying out a secret court order permitting the wiretapping of all Internet communications at the United Nations headquarters, a customer of AT&T. [...]

The companies’ sorting of data has allowed the N.S.A. to bring different surveillance powers to bear. Targeting someone on American soil requires a court order under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. When a foreigner abroad is communicating with an American, that law permits the government to target that foreigner without a warrant. When foreigners are messaging other foreigners, that law does not apply and the government can collect such emails in bulk without targeting anyone.

AT&T’s provision of foreign-to-foreign traffic has been particularly important to the N.S.A. because large amounts of the world’s Internet communications travel across American cables. AT&T provided access to the contents of transiting email traffic for years before Verizon began doing so in March 2013, the documents show. They say AT&T gave the N.S.A. access to “massive amounts of data,” and by 2013 the program was processing 60 million foreign-to-foreign emails a day. [...]

[Rfi] Google challenges France over 'right to be forgotten'

Google, the internet search giant, took a strong stance against the censorship of its search results, telling French regulators in a blog post that it will not implement so-called “right to be forgotten” requests on a worldwide basis.

Google applied a May 2014 ruling by the European Court of Justice that allows users to ask search engines to delist links with personal information about them. It has since then set up a platform allowing anyone who wishes to be delisted from links to do so. The CNIL, the French data protection authority, asked Google to apply this globally and not only for and other European sites. [...]

“This is a very difficult debate because in many cases, it is important to protect the right to privacy and to do so at a global level, but it can also be difficult to make a judgment” said Felix Treguer, from the Squaring of the Net, an advocacy group that promotes digital rights and freedoms of citizens.

“For instance, when countries such as Iran, or other countries with little respect for freedom of expression decide that, for example, content regarding homosexual practices for example, is illegal, and order Google in Iran to take down that content at a global level, we, in western democracies, and many people around the world would think this goes too far.”

It begs the question of freedom of speech, but also of how much privacy a person is allowed to have as well. [...]

[Bloomberg] Facebook Ordered by Hamburg Regulator to Allow Pseudonyms

Facebook Inc. was ordered by a German privacy watchdog to allow users to have accounts under pseudonyms on the social network. [...]

Tuesday’s order is based on a complaint by a user who’d sought to prevent her private Facebook account from being used by people wishing to contact her about business matters. [...]

The social network in 2013 was able to fend off an attack by another German regulator by convincing national courts that only the Irish authority has jurisdiction over the issue. [...]

[TheGuardian] France and the UK are on the edge of Kafkaesque surveillance

Surveillance laws being debated around the world should avoid the recent fate of the French – and the scorn of Franz Kafka. [...]

The French case shows that the long-cherished secrecy of communications – a notion dating at least as far back as the French Revolution – has no constitutional priority. It shows the gripping appeal of laws that, in Kafka’s terms, provide a false sense of security and leave the people – particularly people in certain communities – helplessly exposed. On Sunday 26 July, the law came into effect. [...]

Effective intelligence is critical to the challenges we face. But that intelligence must be targeted, and it must be subject to due process, transparency and meaningful independent oversight. Measures that inhibit all of our freedoms must be subject to open, fair, evidenced-based debate, rather than cynical emergency procedures. And even if an individual is prepared to surrender all privacy in order to accept a minute reduction in risk of a catastrophic event, what safeguards are in place to prevent even greater catastrophes, in the hands of a state, oft-captured and oft-brutal, knowing and seeing all?

The tools that France and Britain are currently seeking are too blunt and intrusive for modern democracies. They stifle dissent with the same chilling turn uttered by Robespierre, one of the main leaders of the Reign of Terror during the French Revolution in condemning his former friend and close ally Danton to the guillotine for alleged counter-revolutionary activities: “anyone who trembles at this moment is guilty; for innocence never fears public surveillance”. [...]

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