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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
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[TheIntercept] Facing Data Deluge, Secret U.K. Spying Report Warned of Intelligence Failure

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats. [...]

MI5 “can currently collect (whether itself or through partners …) significantly more than it is able to exploit fully,” the report warned. “This creates a real risk of ‘intelligence failure’ i.e. from the Service being unable to access potentially life-saving intelligence from data that it has already collected.” [...]

The new revelations raise questions about whether problems sifting through the troves of data collected by British spies may have been a factor in the failure to prevent the Rigby killing. But they are also of broader relevance to an ongoing debate in the U.K. about surveillance. In recent months, the British government has been trying to pass a new law, the Investigatory Powers Bill, which would grant MI5 and other agencies access to more data. [...]

https://theintercept.com/2016/06/07/mi5-gchq-digint-surveillance-data-de...

[WIRED] Privacy Shield Will Let US Tech Giants Grab Europeans’ Data

[WIRED] Privacy Shield Will Let US Tech Giants Grab Europeans’ Data

Companies like Facebook and Google can continue transferring data from the European Union to their servers in the US under a new deal between the two governments that privacy advocates still say isn’t good enough.

The Privacy Shield replaces the EU’s so-called Safe Harbor Decision, in place since 2000, which asserted that the US provided adequate privacy protections to meet EU standards, providing US-based tech companies legal cover for transferring data from Europe to their home servers. [...]

Privacy advocates say those protections are inadequate and want to see the Privacy Shield quashed. The ombudsperson will have limited power to fix problems and won’t be all that independent since that person will report to the Secretary of State, argues Privacy International. [...]

http://www.wired.com/2016/07/privacy-shield-will-let-us-tech-giants-grab...

[Arstechnica] Europol’s online censorship unit is haphazard and unaccountable says NGO

[Arstechnica] Europol’s online censorship unit is haphazard and unaccountable says NGO

Europol’s Internet Referral Unit (IRU) celebrated its first birthday at the weekend, but civil liberties organisations are worried that it goes too far in its efforts to keep the Web free from extremist propaganda.

The IRU has been up and running since July 2015 as part of the European Counter Terrorism Centre (ECTC) in the Hague. The unit is charged with monitoring the Internet for extremist propaganda and referring “relevant online content towards concerned Internet service providers” in particular social media. Much was made of how the IRU could "contact social network service provider Facebook directly to ask it to delete a Web page run by ISIS or request details of other pages that might be run by the same user” [...].

However AccessNow a global digital rights organisation said Europe’s approach to dealing with online extremism is “haphazard, alarming, tone-deaf, and entirely counter-productive” [...].

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/07/europol-iru-extremist-content...

[ArsTechnica] Big telcos promise awesome 5G—in exchange for weak net neutrality

A coalition of nearly 20 telcos including BT, Deutsche Telekom, Ericsson, Hutchison, Nokia, Orange, Telefonica, Telenor, and Vodafone have drawn up what they call their "5G Manifesto"—outlining what they want from governments in order to deliver 5G coverage across Europe. [...]

However, there is a caveat: the telcos warn of the "danger" of strict regulation and want net neutrality rules to be watered down. Net neutrality is the principle that Internet service providers should treat all data the same, by not discriminating or applying different charges regardless of type of content or user. [...]

The telcos also want net neutrality laws to allow “innovative specialised services,” adding that “5G introduces the concept of network slicing to accommodate a wide variety of industry verticals’ business models on a common platform, at scale and with services guarantees.”

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/07/5g-vowed-by-telcos-demand-wea...

[Policito] Privacy shield dead on arrival

[Policito EU] Privacy shield dead on arrival

The EU-US data transfer plan took several tough hits over the past week [...].

The European Commission pushed back a deadline it set for itself to finalize the agreement by end of May to sometime before “this summer,” but isn’t giving up on the agreement struck with Washington in February. Ruling out any renegotiation in the wake of pushback from EU national regulators and the Parliament, EU officials say they’re going to implement the accord, knowing that court challenges are inevitable. Those challenges could take years to get through the court system. [...]

Uncertainty around the future of trans-Atlantic data transfers leaves more than 4,000 companies on both sides of the ocean that had signed up to safe harbor in limbo. Champions of the data pact reacted with frustration to the latest political setbacks in Europe. [...]

The European Parliament’s resolution on the privacy shield acknowledges its improvements over the safe harbor pact, but pointed out that U.S. intelligence services can still snoop on EU citizens’ data in ways that “does not meet the stricter criteria of necessity and proportionality as required under the Charter [of Fundamental Rights]” — one of the reasons safe harbor didn’t survive the beating at the European court. [...]

http://www.politico.eu/article/privacy-shield-dead-on-arrival/

[TheIndependent] Any computer connected to the internet can be hacked by the US Government without a warrant, court rules

If a computer has a connection to the internet means no warrant is required for the US government to hack it, a Virginia court has ruled.
The judge angered privacy campaigners by reasoning that since no connected computer “is immune from invasion”, no user should ever expect their their activity to remain secret. [...]

Scarlet Kim, legal officer at Privacy International, told The Independent the verdict would have “astounding implications for the privacy and security of anyone who owns an electronic device”. [...]
The justification that the rise in hacking destroys a reasonable expectation of privacy in these devices is illogical and absurd.” [...]

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/computer-internet-hacke...

[EurActiv] Privacy Shield agreement signed off despite vote abstentions

EU member states today (8 July) signed off on the controversial Privacy Shield agreement for data transfers to the US, locking down the final deal after the European Commission haggled for months with the US over legal details.

Four out of 28 EU diplomats abstained from the final vote. The Commission instructed diplomats not to publicly state how they voted. [...]

Schrems already said he would challenge Privacy Shield in court as well because the deal doesn’t have strict enough privacy safeguards. [...]

http://www.euractiv.com/section/digital/news/privacy-shield-agreement-si...

[TheVerge] President Obama should pardon Edward Snowden before leaving office

[TheVerge] President Obama should pardon Edward Snowden before leaving office

For the last three years, one month, and seven days, Edward Snowden has been living in exile from the United States. [...]
The implicit point is that if Snowden is going to come home, his best chance is a presidential pardon, which is unlikely to come from Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. The final days of Obama’s final term are the best chance Snowden has, which gives Wizner and his team a little more than six months to make their case.

Pardoning Snowden is the right thing to do, and if you care about a free and secure internet, you should support it [...]. Clemency is particularly important because it will be impossible to defend Snowden’s leaks as a public service in court [...].

The president has prosecuted more whistleblowers under the Espionage Act than all presidents before him combined [...] With Snowden’s push for clemency, the president has a chance to complicate that legacy and begin to undo it. It’s the last chance he’ll have.

http://www.theverge.com/2016/6/27/12040196/president-obama-pardon-edward...

[TheGuardian] Russia passes 'Big Brother' anti-terror laws

[TheGuardian] Russia passes 'Big Brother' anti-terror laws

Russia’s parliament has passed harsh anti-terrorism measures that human rights campaigners including the NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden say will roll back personal freedoms and privacy [...].

The legislation obliges telephone and internet providers to store records of all communications for six months and all metadata for three years, as well as help intelligence agencies decode encrypted messaging services. Telecoms firms have complained that users rather than providers typically possess the encryption keys, and that storing this huge amount of information would require expensive new infrastructure [...].

Tanya Lokshina, the Russia programme director for Human Rights Watch, called it an attack on freedom of expression, freedom of conscience and the right to privacy that gives law enforcement unreasonably broad powers;[...].

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/26/russia-passes-big-brother-...

[Arstechnica] Web content blocking plan for EU's draft anti-terrorism law hits stumbling block

Technical difficulties delay vote as civil liberties MEPs tinker with text. [...]

The latest draft of the directive on combating terrorism contains proposals on blocking websites that promote or incite terror attacks. Member states “may take all necessary measures to remove or to block access to webpages publicly inciting to commit terrorist offences,” says text submitted by German MEP and rapporteur Monika Hohlmeier. [...]

Estelle Masse, EU policy analyst for digital rights outfit Access, told Ars: “The new text is an improvement, but it still does not address the fundamental censorship problem that the Council of Europe warned about.” She added that it was strange the European Parliament had inserted this text into a draft law that, when originally proposed by officials in Brussels, made no mention of removing or blocking online content. [...]

http://arstechnica.co.uk/tech-policy/2016/06/web-content-blocking-plan-e...

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