Revue de presse

The press review RSS feed

The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[Wired] As Zuckerberg Smiles to Congress, Facebook Fights State Privacy Laws

[Wired] As Zuckerberg Smiles to Congress, Facebook Fights State Privacy Laws

[...] Facebook pours millions of dollars into state and federal lobbying efforts, some of which oppose legislation designed to bolster privacy. The company has contributed to the campaigns of representatives who want to gut the Illinois privacy law referenced by Durbin, and it ponied up $200,000 to oppose a consumer privacy ballot initiative in California. Wednesday, shortly after Zuckerberg finished testifying in Washington, Facebook said it was no longer contributing to the group opposing the California measure.

I’m sitting here watching Mark Zuckerberg say he’s sorry and that Facebook will do better on privacy, yet literally as he testifies lobbyists paid by Facebook in Illinois and California are working to stop or gut privacy laws,” says Alvaro Bedoya, a professor and the executive director of the Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law School. “If Facebook wants to do better on privacy, it needs to put its money where its mouth is, it needs to stop paying lobbyists to gut critical privacy initiatives in these states." [...]

https://www.wired.com/story/despite-zuckerberg-pledge-facebook-fights-st...

[Bloomberg] U.K. Assessing Evidence After Search at Cambridge Analytica

[Bloomberg] U.K. Assessing Evidence After Search at Cambridge Analytica

The U.K.’s privacy watchdog searched the offices of Cambridge Analytica amid allegations that information on millions of Facebook Inc.’s users was scooped up without their consent, widening a probe that cut the internet giant’s share price more than 10 percent this week. [...]

The watchdog is leading the probe with the backing of the European Union’s remaining 27 regulators, who this week vowed to collaborate to get to the bottom of the “very serious allegation with far-reaching consequences.” [...]

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-03-23/u-k-watchdog-gets-war...

[Reuters] Dutch say 'no' in referendum on spy agency tapping powers

[Reuters] Dutch say 'no' in referendum on spy agency tapping powers

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Dutch voters have narrowly rejected a law that would give spy agencies the power to carry out mass tapping of Internet traffic delivering a setback to Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s government.

Dubbed the “trawling law” by opponents, the legislation would allow spy agencies to install wire taps targeting an entire geographic region or avenue of communication, store information for up to three years, and share it with allied spy agencies. [...]

Bits of Freedom campaigned for a “no” vote, saying it feared privacy violations, although taps must be approved beforehand by an independent panel. [...]

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-netherlands-referendum/dutch-say-no-i...

[TorrentFreak] Piracy Can Help Music Sales of Many Artists, Research Shows

[TorrentFreak] Piracy Can Help Music Sales of Many Artists, Research Shows

A new academic paper published in the Information Economics and Policy journal shows that piracy can help many artists to sell more music. Results from the peer-reviewed paper are consistent for both digital and physical sales and affect mid-tier artists. Top musicians are not so lucky, as they sell less. [...]

One of the more extensive studies was published this month in the peer-reviewed Information Economics and Policy journal, by Queen’s University economics researcher Jonathan Lee.

In a paper titled ‘Purchase, pirate, publicize: Private-network music sharing and market album sales’ he examined the effect of BitTorrent-based piracy on both digital and physical music sales. [...]

https://torrentfreak.com/piracy-can-help-music-sales-of-many-artists-res...

[ArsTechnica] California Senate defies FCC, approves net neutrality law

[ArsTechnica] California Senate defies FCC, approves net neutrality law

The California State Senate yesterday approved a bill to impose net neutrality restrictions on Internet service providers, challenging the Federal Communications Commission attempt to preempt such rules. [...]

The FCC is already being sued by 21 states and the District of Columbia, which are trying to reverse the net neutrality repeal and the preemption of state laws. Attempts to enforce net neutrality rules at the state or local level could end up being challenged in separate lawsuits. [...]

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/01/california-senate-approves-n...

[TheGuardian] Net neutrality: why are Americans so worried about it being scrapped ?

[TheGuardian] Net neutrality: why are Americans so worried about it being scrapped?

Most of the world won’t be affected by the changes, so are they a problem ? No, if you are a tech monopoly – but yes if you don’t want a two-tier internet. [...]

On the other side of the battle are companies relying on the internet to connect to customers. Their fear is that in an unregulated internet, ISPs may charge customers extra to visit certain websites, demand fees from the sites themselves to be delivered at full-speed, or privilege their own services over those of competitors.

The fear is well-founded. Outside the US, where net neutrality laws are weaker and rarely enforced, ISPs have been experimenting with the sorts of favouritism that a low-regulation environment permits. [...]

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/nov/22/net-neutrality-intern...

[TheRegister] Leaked: The UK's secret blueprint with telcos for mass spying on internet, phones – and backdoors

[TheRegister] Leaked: The UK's secret blueprint with telcos for mass spying on internet, phones – and backdoors

The UK government has secretly drawn up more details of its new bulk surveillance powers – awarding itself the ability to monitor Brits' live communications, and insert encryption backdoors by the backdoor.

In its draft technical capability notices paper [PDF], all communications companies – including phone networks and ISPs – will be obliged to provide real-time access to the full content of any named individual within one working day, as well as any "secondary data" relating to that person. [...]

There is no mention of the technical capability notices paper existing either on the Home Office website or on the Gov.uk consultation website. And the only reason we know about it is presumably because someone at one of the few companies that have been sent the draft rules decided to tell Open Rights Group about it. [...]

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/05/04/uk_bulk_surveillance_powers_draft/

[ArsTechnica] Net neutrality rules took away your Internet freedom, FCC chair claims

[ArsTechnica] Net neutrality rules took away your Internet freedom, FCC chair claims

Did you feel a sudden loss of Internet freedom in February 2015 ? That's when the Federal Communications Commission imposed net neutrality rules that prevent Internet service providers from discriminating against websites and other online services. And that's when Americans lost their Internet freedom—according to the current FCC chairman, Ajit Pai.

Pai, a Republican and former Verizon lawyer, opposed the net neutrality rules when Democrats held the commission's majority, and he quickly got to work dismantling the rules after being appointed chair by President Donald Trump. To convince the public that the FCC should eliminate rules it passed two years ago, Pai's office yesterday issued a press release titled, "Restoring Internet freedom for all Americans." [...]

But consumer advocacy groups and Web companies urged the FCC to preserve net neutrality rules, saying they are crucial for giving online businesses access to customers and for letting Internet customers use the applications and websites of their choice. Advocacy group Free Press published an updated list of incidents in which ISPs interfered with Internet content in the years before Title II net neutrality rules were implemented. [...]

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/04/net-neutrality-rules-took-aw...

[Wired] Why the FCC’s Plans to Gut Net Neutrality Just Might Fail

[Wired] Why the FCC’s Plans to Gut Net Neutrality Just Might Fail

It’s official : the country’s top regulator of the internet wants to end net neutrality. Specifically, Federal Communications Commission chair Ajit Pai plans to repeal changes that gave the agency the authority to enforce net neutrality protections—that is, rules requiring internet service providers to treat all internet traffic equally. But he won’t likely be able to do so without a big legal fight. [...]

The FCC will vote on—and given its Republican majority, likely pass—the proposal during an open meeting May 18. But that will only start what promises to be a lengthy battle for the future of net neutrality. To truly torpedo the requirements, Pai will have to make the case that he’s doing so for good reason.

A 1946 law called the Administrative Procedure Act bans federal agencies making “capricious” decisions. The law is meant, in part, to keep regulations from yo-yoing back and forth every time a new party gained control of the White House. The FCC successfully argued in favor of Title II reclassification in federal court just last summer. That effort means Pai might have to make the case that things had changed enough since then to justify a complete reversal in policy. [...]

https://www.wired.com/2017/04/fccs-plans-gut-net-neutrality-just-might-f...

[TheVerge] US Senate votes to let internet providers share your web browsing history without permission

[TheVerge] US Senate votes to let internet providers share your web browsing history without permission

The US Senate has voted to overturn consumer-friendly internet privacy rules that would have prevented internet providers from sharing your web browsing history without permission.

The privacy rules, passed last year by the FCC, required internet providers like Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T to get each customer’s permission before sharing personal information like which websites they visit. But internet providers want to be able to sell that data and use it to target ads, so they’ve been vocal about opposing the rules since around the time President Trump took office. [...]

This resolution is a direct attack on consumer rights, on privacy, on rules that afford basic protection against intrusive and illegal interference with consumers' use of social media sites and websites that often they talk for granted,” Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) said in the Senate today ahead of the vote. [...]

http://www.theverge.com/2017/3/23/15026666/senate-broadband-privacy-rule...

Syndiquer le contenu