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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[ArstTechnica] NSA spied on EU politicians and companies with help from German intelligence

Spies failed to check properly what was being passed across to the US. […]

Germany's intelligence service, the Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND), has been helping the NSA spy on European politicians and companies for years, according to the German news magazine Der Spiegel. The NSA has been sending lists of "selectors"—identifying telephone numbers, e-mail and IP addresses—to the BND, which then provides related information that it holds in its surveillance databases. According to the German newspaper Die Zeit, the NSA sent selector lists several times a day, and altogether 800,000 selectors have been requested. […]

The information about this activity has finally come out thanks to a long-running committee of inquiry, set up by the German Bundestag (federal parliament), which has been trying to get to the bottom of the NSA activities in Germany, and of the BND's involvement in them. The committee's investigation suggests that as many as 40,000 of the selectors were targeting European and German interests—far more than the 2,000 found by the BND. […]

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/04/24/nsa-spied-on-eu-politician...

[EurActiv] Outcry over French Intelligence Bill

Despite the heated debates around the implications of the French Intelligence Bill on civil liberties, a tentative agreement between right and left may guarantee its adoption. EurActiv France reports. […]

Civil society organisations spoke out against this unlikely alliance, which "robs the nation of its parliamentary system". Several dozen demonstrators denounced the "mass surveillance" proposed by the bill outside the National Assembly on Monday 13 April, before the debates began. If successful, the text would hugely increase the powers of the French intelligence services.

The major data hosts, including Ghandi and OVH, Europe's biggest host, have also criticised the bill for adding prohibitive layers of extra cost that could force them to relocate. […]

http://www.euractiv.com/sections/infosociety/outcry-over-french-intellig...

[Politico] Leaked digital single market’s ‘evidence file’ reveals Commission’s ambitions

Leaked copies of the upcoming Digital Single Market Strategy and its supporting Evidence file show the European Commission is ready to propose vast regulatory reforms that could affect everything from sales taxes and e-privacy to Internet searches and big data. […]

It’s no secret that a wide-scale review of copyright laws is in the works. An internal document drafted in February by the digital economy department reveals that a deal is being sought by the creative industries. The industries would loosen geo-blocking, meaning they would allow more consumers in other countries to buy products or access apps and websites. In exchange, the Commission would more aggressively enforce copyright. […]

Raising some eyebrows is the grouping in the strategy of examples of child abuse imagery and terrorism with copyright-offending material – a new development, and a signal that copyright infringement is about to be taken more seriously. […]

In a dig aimed at the Council, the Commission’s document pointedly identifies their failure to finalize a substantial Telecom Single Market package, known as “Connected Continent”. The inter-service version of the new plan, now circulating, confirms that the Commission is giving up on much of the Connected Continent and, for now, settling for a deal restricted to roaming and net neutrality. […]

http://www.politico.eu/article/leaked-digital-single-market-strategy-evi...

[NYTimes] The French Surveillance State

[Opinion pages of the NYT] Prime Minister Manuel Valls of France has presented yet another antiterrorism bill to Parliament. French lawmakers, who overwhelmingly approved a sweeping antiterrorism bill in September, are scheduled to debate the new bill this month. [...]

Rights groups have warned that the bill, which includes the risk of “collective violence” and “the defense of foreign policy interests” among potential reasons for government surveillance, is too vague in defining who is a legitimate target. The bill also concentrates extraordinary power in the office of the prime minister by giving it, rather than judges, control over the approval process for surveillance requests from intelligence agencies. [...]

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/01/opinion/the-french-surveillance-state....

[NyTimes] The French Surveillance State

Prime Minister Manuel Valls of France has presented yet another antiterrorism bill to Parliament. French lawmakers, who overwhelmingly approved a sweeping antiterrorism bill in September, are scheduled to debate the new bill this month. Mr. Valls argues that the bill’s sweeping new provisions for government surveillance are necessary to monitor potential terrorist-related activity, especially on the Internet and cellphones. […]

Rights groups have warned that the bill, which includes the risk of “collective violence” and “the defense of foreign policy interests” among potential reasons for government surveillance, is too vague in defining who is a legitimate target. The bill also concentrates extraordinary power in the office of the prime minister by giving it, rather than judges, control over the approval process for surveillance requests from intelligence agencies. Parliament must restore judicial oversight to these decisions that touch the core rights and freedoms of French citizens. […]

The French are understandably jittery after the Paris and Tunis attacks, and they are alarmed by the radicalization of some in France who have fallen prey to jihadist recruitment on the Internet. There is no doubt that the French government has a duty to protect the nation from terrorist violence and jihadist recruitment. But Parliament has a duty to protect citizens’ democratic rights from unduly expansive and intrusive government surveillance. French lawmakers should not approve the bill unless judges are given a proper role in authorizing government surveillance, vague definitions of what constitutes a terrorist threat are struck from the bill and freedom of the press is protected.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/01/opinion/the-french-surveillance-state....

[Reuters] EU executive plans no new data retention law

reuters

The European Commission will not introduce a new law requiring telecom companies to store the communications data of European Union citizens for security purposes, the EU home affairs commissioner said on Thursday. […]

In April last year the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled that an EU data retention directive requiring telecoms companies to store communications data for up to two years interfered with people's right to privacy by creating the impression that their private lives are the subject of constant surveillance. […]

An internal Commission document circulated in January showed Avramopoulos was considering launching consultations to determine whether a new law on data retention that respects privacy rights could be prepared over the coming year. […]

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/03/12/us-eu-data-telecommunications-...

[TheRegister] Snowden, NSA spying, hard drive malware ... what we need is a UN privacy watchdog!

EFF writes a very angry letter asking United Nations to write a very angry letter to the US. […]

Currently, says the EFF, the UN does not have adequate measures in place to ensure people have a decent amount of privacy from the powers that be – and judging by Edward Snowden's revelations of NSA spying, there's no such thing as privacy if Uncle Sam has an interest in you. […]

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/03/04/eff_un_human_rights/

[BBC] EU data roaming and net neutrality plans attacked

European regulators have dropped plans to ban roaming charges and have proposed net neutrality rules allowing privileged access in some cases. […]

According to documents seen by the BBC, far from ending data roaming charges as was promised, the Council of the European Union has recommended that operators be allowed to add surcharges to their domestic rates. […]

The proposals also covered net neutrality rules. They sought to ensure that internet users could get online however they wanted and view any legal content they wanted, free from discrimination by their service providers. […]

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-31748592

[Thewhir] Legal Changes Give French Police Power to Take Down Porn, Terrorism Sites without Court Order

French police can order Internet service providers to take down websites without a court order on child pornography or terrorism accusations as of Tuesday. The legal changes follow a statement late last week by President Francois Hollande that companies hosting extremist messages are “accomplices.” […]

DNS blocking can be easily circumvented, however, says Felix Tréguer of French internet advocacy group La Quadrature du Net. The group is also concerned about legal content being blocked.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation shares concerns about the new system. “In light of the recent arrests that have followed the Charlie Hebdo attacks — many of which are clearly overboard — I would say that France’s government needs to seriously think about whether this law will stop terrorists, or merely chill speech,” Jillian York of the EFF told The Verge in an email. […]

http://www.thewhir.com/web-hosting-news/legal-changes-give-french-police...

[TheGuardian] Net Neutrality Is Only The Beginning Of An Open Internet

US regulators are voting on whether to enshrine the openness of the internet, and the outcome is likely to influence policy worldwide.

Net neutrality is the principle of making sure that your internet service provider doesn’t make it easier for you to access one service over another – the Guardian over the Telegraph, say – or otherwise distorting your use of internet services just because someone dropped a few extra quid in their pocket. […]

We citizens, often derogated as “users” or “consumers”, have much to win in a global communication space. That is much more than simply a “neutral network”. Instead, it is a truly open, distributed network where everyone’s fundamental rights are respected. Not having our access providers acting as interested gatekeepers may be a step in the right direction, but it is by no means an end. Many other distortive factors remain and we will not have an open space until we get rid of them all.

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/feb/26/net-neutrality-is-only...

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