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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[TheNewtWeb] Facebook! Stop sending us lobbyists! demands European Parliament

[TheNewtWeb] Facebook! Stop sending us lobbyists! demands European Parliament

The European Parliament is sick and tired of Facebook refusing to properly answer its questions. After the fiasco of the Mark Zuckerberg show, a further two hearings are planned for June 25 in Brussels and July 2 in Strasbourg. [...]

In a letter to Zuckerberg, seen by The Next Web, civil liberties committee chairman Claude Moraes says : “ I would like to stress it is essential for Facebook’s credibility to show its commitment that you send staff members that are in charge of the departments concerned in your company and not public policy team members. ”

In other words, the European Parliament is quite fed up of lobbyists and wants real answers. [...]

https://thenextweb.com/contributors/2018/06/08/facebook-stop-sending-us-...

[BoingBoing] #NetNeutrality: 49 Senators urge Ryan to schedule House vote before protections expire

[BoingBoing] #NetNeutrality: 49 Senators urge Ryan to schedule House vote before protections expire

In Washington today [NDLQDN JUN 7], U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan received a letter signed by 47 Senate Democrats and two independents calling on him to schedule a vote to keep Net Neutrality rules active.

Under Trump's FCC chief Ajit Pai, the Obama-era rules to help keep the internet free, fair, and equal will die next week.

Ryan's office would not respond to reporters, and referred questions on Net Neutrality to the House Energy and Commerce Committee. [...]

https://boingboing.net/2018/06/07/net-neutrality-deathwatch.html

[TheVerge] Facebook and Google hit with $8.8 billion in lawsuits on day one of GDPR

[TheVerge] Facebook and Google hit with $8.8 billion in lawsuits on day one of GDPR

On the first day of GDPR enforcement, Facebook and Google have been hit with a raft of lawsuits accusing the companies of coercing users into sharing personal data. The lawsuits, which seek to fine Facebook 3.9 billion and Google 3.7 billion euro (roughly $8.8 billion in dollars), were filed by Austrian privacy activist Max Schrems, a longtime critic of the companies’ data collection practices. [...]

Both Google and Facebook have rolled out new policies and products to comply with GDPR, but Schrems’ complaints argue those policies don’t go far enough. In particular, the complaint singles out the way companies obtain consent for the privacy policies, asking users to check a box in order to access services. It’s a widespread practice for online services, but the complaints argue that it forces users into an all-or-nothing choice, a violation of the GDPR’s provisions around particularized consent. [...]

https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/25/17393766/facebook-google-gdpr-lawsuit...

[TheVerge] New Toronto Declaration calls on algorithms to respect human rights

[TheVerge] New Toronto Declaration calls on algorithms to respect human rights

Today in Toronto, a coalition of human rights and technology groups released a new declaration on machine learning standards, calling on both governments and tech companies to ensure that algorithms respect basic principles of equality and non-discrimination. Called The Toronto Declaration, the document focuses on the obligation to prevent machine learning systems from discriminating, and in some cases violating, existing human rights law. The declaration was announced as part of the RightsCon conference, an annual gathering of digital and human rights groups.

“ We must keep our focus on how these technologies will affect individual human beings and human rights, ” the preamble reads. “ In a world of machine learning systems, who will bear accountability for harming human rights ? ”

The declaration has already been signed by Amnesty International, Access Now, Human Rights Watch, and the Wikimedia Foundation. More signatories are expected in the weeks to come. [...]

https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/16/17361356/toronto-declaration-machine-...

[Wired] Senate Votes to Save Net Neutrality, but Hurdles Remain

[Wired] Senate Votes to Save Net Neutrality, but Hurdles Remain

The Senate Wednesday voted to preserve net neutrality, with three Republicans joining all of the chamber’s Democrats and independents to block a Federal Communications Commission plan to undo Obama-era rules governing the internet. The vote is a major victory for net neutrality activists, but the plan still has a long way to go before it could take effect. [...]

The proposal passed narrowly in the Senate, where activists only needed to win over two Republicans. In the House, they'll have to woo more than 20 Republicans, even with unanimous Democratic support. Meanwhile, the White House has expressed support for FCC chair Ajit Pai's decision to reverse the Obama-era rules, and Trump denounced net neutrality in a 2014 tweet. It's a longshot, but it's not quite impossible. Trump is known to change his mind from time to time, and House Republicans could decide that voting against net neutrality would be politically problematic. [...]

https://www.wired.com/story/senate-approves-measure-to-save-net-neutrality

[TheGuardian] Net neutrality advocates gain symbolic win as Senate votes to save Obama rules

[TheGuardian] Net neutrality advocates gain symbolic win as Senate votes to save Obama rules

Advocates for net neutrality won a symbolic victory Wednesday when the Senate voted 52-47 to preserve Obama-era regulations that require internet service providers to treat all web traffic equally.

But the resolution also requires passage by the Republican-controlled House and Donald Trump’s signature to be enacted – an unlikely outcome before the Federal Communications Commission’s repeal of net neutrality rules goes into effect next month.

Deemed “the most important vote for the internet in the history of the US Senate” by author Senator Ed Markey, a Democrat from Massachusetts, the resolution would reverse the FCC’s December 2017 repeal of net neutrality rules that were put in place in 2015. [...]

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/may/16/net-neutrality-us-sen...

[ArsTechnica] Senate votes to overturn Ajit Pai’s net neutrality repeal

[ArsTechnica] Senate votes to overturn Ajit Pai’s net neutrality repeal

The US Senate today voted to reverse the Federal Communications Commission's repeal of net neutrality rules, with all members of the Democratic caucus and three Republicans voting in favor of net neutrality. [...]

Markey said that net neutrality rules are needed because of events like Comcast throttling BitTorrent traffic and AT&T blocking Skype and other voice applications that compete against its mobile phone service.

" Net neutrality is the free speech issue of our time, " Markey said.

Large majorities of both Democratic and Republican voters support net neutrality, Markey noted. Thousands of small businesses wrote to Congress in support of net neutrality, and " millions of Americans sent letters, posted tweets, and made calls defending net neutrality, " he said. [...]

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/05/senate-votes-to-overturn-aji...

[Wired] As Zuckerberg Smiles to Congress, Facebook Fights State Privacy Laws

[Wired] As Zuckerberg Smiles to Congress, Facebook Fights State Privacy Laws

[...] Facebook pours millions of dollars into state and federal lobbying efforts, some of which oppose legislation designed to bolster privacy. The company has contributed to the campaigns of representatives who want to gut the Illinois privacy law referenced by Durbin, and it ponied up $200,000 to oppose a consumer privacy ballot initiative in California. Wednesday, shortly after Zuckerberg finished testifying in Washington, Facebook said it was no longer contributing to the group opposing the California measure.

I’m sitting here watching Mark Zuckerberg say he’s sorry and that Facebook will do better on privacy, yet literally as he testifies lobbyists paid by Facebook in Illinois and California are working to stop or gut privacy laws,” says Alvaro Bedoya, a professor and the executive director of the Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law School. “If Facebook wants to do better on privacy, it needs to put its money where its mouth is, it needs to stop paying lobbyists to gut critical privacy initiatives in these states." [...]

https://www.wired.com/story/despite-zuckerberg-pledge-facebook-fights-st...

[Bloomberg] U.K. Assessing Evidence After Search at Cambridge Analytica

[Bloomberg] U.K. Assessing Evidence After Search at Cambridge Analytica

The U.K.’s privacy watchdog searched the offices of Cambridge Analytica amid allegations that information on millions of Facebook Inc.’s users was scooped up without their consent, widening a probe that cut the internet giant’s share price more than 10 percent this week. [...]

The watchdog is leading the probe with the backing of the European Union’s remaining 27 regulators, who this week vowed to collaborate to get to the bottom of the “very serious allegation with far-reaching consequences.” [...]

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-03-23/u-k-watchdog-gets-war...

[Reuters] Dutch say 'no' in referendum on spy agency tapping powers

[Reuters] Dutch say 'no' in referendum on spy agency tapping powers

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Dutch voters have narrowly rejected a law that would give spy agencies the power to carry out mass tapping of Internet traffic delivering a setback to Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s government.

Dubbed the “trawling law” by opponents, the legislation would allow spy agencies to install wire taps targeting an entire geographic region or avenue of communication, store information for up to three years, and share it with allied spy agencies. [...]

Bits of Freedom campaigned for a “no” vote, saying it feared privacy violations, although taps must be approved beforehand by an independent panel. [...]

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-netherlands-referendum/dutch-say-no-i...

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