Press review about Net Neutrality

[GigaOm] Forget fast lanes. The real threat for net-neutrality is zero-rated content

When telcos zero-rate data used by their apps and their partners’ apps, they are engaging in price discrimination and threatening net neutrality. The practice should be banned in U.S. and Europe. […]

[Dailydot] Why the U.K. might kill the EU's net neutrality law

While the debate over net neutrality continues to rage in the United States, the British government is planning to block European Union legislation on the matter.

It’s a surprising turn of events. Just last month, the European Parliament voted to place the principles of net neutrality into law. However, before it becomes law throughout Europe, each member country must also pass the legislation. On Thursday, the British government indicated it may veto it instead.

[TorrentFreak] Music Industry Demands Pirate Bay Blockade in France

The major record labels continue their efforts to drive The Pirate Bay underground with France being the next in line. A local music industry group has informed several ISPs that it has requested a court blocking injunction against the popular torrent site. In addition, more than a hundred Pirate Bay proxies are also being targeted. […]

[EurActiv] Italian presidency to support Parliament-backed telecoms reform

The incoming Italian presidency of the European Union is ready to support the European Parliament-backed overhaul of EU telecoms rules, despite widespread criticism of the plan from governments and leading operators. […]

Italy, whose presidency of the EU will start in July and will run until the end of the year, seems ready to go against the tide of other member states.

A diplomatic source confirmed that the objective of the incoming presidency is to defend the parliament's text and have it approved by the council. […]

[NewYorker] Goodbye, Net Neutrality; Hello, Net Discrimination : The New Yorker

A blog post by Tim Wu, inventor of the term "network neutrality", comments on the implications on the FCC, the Federal Communications Commission, who have "proposed a new rule that [...] permits and encourages [...] broadband carriers acting as gatekeepers and charging Web sites a payola payment to reach customers through a “fast lane.”[...]"

[NYTimes] F.C.C., in a Shift, Backs Fast Lanes for Web Traffic

The Federal Communications Commission said on Wednesday that it would propose new rules that allow companies like Disney, Google or Netflix to pay Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon for special, faster lanes to send video and other content to their customers.

[TechDirt] Protests Mount Against Mexico's Proposed Telecommunications Law, Which Would Bring In Censorship, Allow Real-time Surveillance And Kill Net Neutrality

[...] On the face of it then, a new Mexican telecoms law that aims to loosen the grip of those dominant companies should be a good thing. But increasingly people are worried that its bad elements may outweigh the good [...].

That's a pretty toxic mix -- censorship, real-time surveillance and no net neutrality. The good news is that Mexicans are starting to mobilize against the proposed measures:

[NYTimes] F.C.C., in a Shift, Backs Fast Lanes for Web Traffic

The principle that all Internet content should be treated equally as it flows through cables and pipes to consumers looks all but dead.

The Federal Communications Commission said on Wednesday that it would propose new rules that allow companies like Disney, Google or Netflix to pay Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon for special, faster lanes to send video and other content to their customers.

[BoingBoing] Message to NETmundial: protect fundamental Internet freedoms

Jeremie [Zimmermann] from France's La Quadrature du Net sez, "The farcical illusion of 'multistakeholder' discussions around 'Internet governance' must be denounced! For the last 15 years those sterile discussions led nowhere, with no concrete action ever emerging. In the meantime, technology as a whole has been turned into a terrifying machine for surveillance, control and oppression.

[Techdirt] Yes, Net Neutrality Is A Solution To An Existing Problem

While AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon have argued -- with incredible message discipline -- that network neutrality is "a solution in search of a problem," that's simply not true.

There are many concrete examples of network neutrality violations around the world. These network neutrality violations include ISPs blocking websites and applications, ISPs discriminating in favor of some applications and against others, and ISPs charging arbitrary tolls on technology companies. [...]

[ArsTechnica] After Netflix pays Comcast, speeds improve 65%

Netflix's decision to pay Comcast for a direct connection to the Comcast network has resulted in significantly better video streaming performance for customers of the nation's largest broadband provider.

Netflix has bemoaned the payment, asking the government to prevent Comcast from demanding such interconnection "tolls."

[...] Comcast's increased speed allowed it to pass Time Warner Cable, Verizon, CenturyLink, AT&T U-verse, and others in Netflix's rankings. Comcast remains slower than Cablevision, Cox, Suddenlink, Charter, and Google Fiber.

[LaJornada] "Ataque directo a la libertad de expresión", la iniciativa de Peña en telecomunicaciones

Cualquier intento por restringir o limitar el acceso a Internet debe entenderse como un ataque directo a la libertad de expresión, advirtió Jérémie Zimmermann, tras señalar que la iniciativa de regulación secundaria a la Ley de Telecomunicaciones, enviada por el gobierno de Enrique Peña Nieto al Congreso, es absolutamente contraria a la apertura que se buscaba con la reforma en el sector, pues tiende a monopolizar este servicio.

[ArsTechnica] One big reason we lack Internet competition: Starting an ISP is really hard

Interesting article describing some of the reasons why it's hard to start an ISP (in the USA), including tactics that bigger companies use to make it harder. Describes business models which touches on the question of Net Neutrality.

http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/04/one-big-reason-we-lack-internet-...

[Gigaom] European Parliament passes strong net neutrality law, along with major roaming reforms

It was a closely-fought contest, but Europe’s crucial telecoms package has passed through its first European Parliament vote, as have amendments that remove loopholes that would have clashed with the open internet. [...]