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Press review about Privacy - Personal Data

[TechDirt] Newly Released Emails Raise Questions Of Whether EU Politicians Sold Out To US On Privacy

Glyn Moody's short article on the suspicions raised by Access that the European Commission, actively worked to weaken the proposed EU Regulation on data protection by collaborating with the US mission in the EU. Moreover, Cecilia Malmström, the current head of the DG Home, who is implicated "has been proposed as the new EU commissioner for trade, who would therefore take over the negotiation of TAFTA/TTIP from Karel De Gucht."

[NewYorker] Google and the Right to Be Forgotten

An article by the weekly magazine The New Yorker on the Right to be Forgotten. Gives an interesting historical perspective on the matter and compares recent demands put on Google to those already in place to safeguard copyright.

[Salon] You don't "have nothing to hide": How privacy breaches are quietly controlling you

Government data collection is scary for many reasons. But least understood: what it does to our personal creativity [...]

[CNN] New leaker disclosing US secrets, government concludes

The federal government has concluded there's a new leaker exposing national security documents in the aftermath of surveillance disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, U.S. officials tell CNN. [...]

[BBC] Wikipedia link hidden by "right to be forgotten"

A Wikipedia entry has been removed from certain Google search results, under the new EU "right to be forgotten" law. [...]

The "right to be forgotten" ruling has been the subject of much controversy since the decision by European Union Court of Justice (ECJ). While the law has been welcomed by some privacy advocates, many groups have said it contravenes the right to free speech, with some even calling it censorship. [...]

[TheGuardian] Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications

The NSA whistleblower, Edward Snowden, has urged lawyers, journalists, doctors, accountants, priests and others with a duty to protect confidentiality to upgrade security in the wake of the spy surveillance revelations.

Snowden said professionals were failing in their obligations to their clients, sources, patients and parishioners in what he described as a new and challenging world.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jul/17/edward-snowden-professional...

[ITWorld] Dutch spy agencies can receive NSA data, court rules

Because raw data is shared in bulk, less stringent privacy safeguards apply, the court said [...]

Dutch intelligence services can receive bulk data that might have been obtained by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) through mass data interception programs, even though collecting data that way is illegal for the Dutch services, the Hague District Court ruled Wednesday. [...]

[ProPublica] Meet the Online Tracking Device That is Virtually Impossible to Block

[...] A new, extremely persistent type of online tracking is shadowing visitors to thousands of top websites, from WhiteHouse.gov to YouPorn.com. [...]

[It] works by instructing the visitor’s Web browser to draw a hidden image. Because each computer draws the image slightly differently, the images can be used to assign each user’s device a number that uniquely identifies it.

[...] They can’t be prevented by using standard Web browser privacy settings or using anti-tracking tools such as AdBlock Plus.

[TheGuardian] Emergency surveillance law to be brought in with cross-party support

Controversial emergency laws will be introduced into the Commons next Monday to reinforce the powers of security services to require internet and phone companies to keep records of their customers' emails and calls. [...]

[TheIntercept] Hacking Online Polls and Other Ways British Spies Seek to Control the Internet

The secretive British spy agency GCHQ has developed covert tools to seed the internet with false information, including the ability to manipulate the results of online polls, artificially inflate pageview counts on web sites, “amplif[y]” sanctioned messages on YouTube, and censor video content judged to be “extremist.” The capabilities, detailed in documents provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, even include an old standby for pre-adolescent prank callers everywhere: A way to connect two unsuspecting phone users together in a call.

[FFII] A license to spy ; cross-border data flows in TTIP

Here is a quote from Harry van Dorenmalen of IBM Europe: "Data flows and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) will be high on the agenda at the Summit. TTIP offers a unique opportunity to set the example as a 21st Century trade agreement that supports cross border data flow provisions…" [...]

[Wired] Glenn Greenwald on Why the Latest Snowden Leak Matters

After weeks of broadcasting his intention to “name names” and publish the identities of specific Americans targeted by the NSA and FBI for surveillance, journalist Glenn Greenwald finally made good on his promise.

[NPR] In Europe, Google Stumbles Between Free Speech And Privacy

Google is trying to make sense of a sweeping decision about the Internet. In May, the European Court of Justice ruled that people have the right to be forgotten. That is, if you don't like something about you that pops up on a Google search, you can make Google hide that result.

The top court left a lot of room for interpretation. Google could have dragged its feet or waited for privacy regulators in the European Union to give more direction. Instead the search giant has moved swiftly to implement the ruling. But it's hitting some bumps. [...]

[WashingtonPost] In NSA-intercepted data, those not targeted far outnumber the foreigners who are

Ordinary Internet users, American and non-American alike, far outnumber legally targeted foreigners in the communications intercepted by the National Security Agency from U.S. digital networks, according to a four-month investigation by The Washington Post. [...]