press release

Turncoat EU Parliament Gives Up on Defending Free Wireless Communications

Update: February 15th, 2012 – The European Parliament as a whole formally adopted the Radio Spectrum Policy Programme

Paris, November 9th, 2011 — In discussions on the future of wireless communications policies, the EU Parliament is giving in to Member States by accepting a watered-down version1 of the Radio Spectrum Policy Programme. Last Spring, the Parliament had made very constructive proposals in favour of open spectrum policies, calling2 for citizen-controlled wireless communications. Sadly, the first major effort to harmonise spectrum policy in Europe is being held back by EU governments' conservatism and the Parliament's surrender.

Political and Judicial Censorship of French Copwatch

Paris, October 14th, 2011 - The Tribunal de Grande Instance de Paris has ordered the blocking of Copwatch Nord-Paris IDF, a website charged by the French government with defaming and putting at risk the safety of police officers.

EU Governments Oppose an Open Wireless Infrastructure

Paris, October 11th, 2011 - As the European Union engages in important discussions on the future of the radio spectrum policy - i.e the future of open wireless communications -, it's becoming clear that national governments are aligned on the position of dominant telecom operators. To protect open wireless communications operated and controlled by citizens, the EU Parliament must resist the pressure and defend its position.

IPRED: the European Commission Must Listen to the Citizens!

Paris, July 11th, 2011 – The European Commission just published the synthesis of the responses to the consultation on the revision of the anti-sharing “IPRED” directive. Among these are a large number of responses from European citizens worried about the transformation of Internet technical intermediaries into a private copyright police. La Quadrature du Net congratulates all citizens for their watchfulness and their responses.

No Net Filtering in the Name of Consumer Protection!

Update, October 4th, 2011 : The National Assembly adopted the controversial provision in first reading.
Update, July 7th, 2011: The amendment to delete the filtering provision was rejected by a one-vote margin by the Committee on Economic Affairs. The one against abusive use of "unlimited Internet" was also rejected. The text now goes to plenary (date still unknown).

Paris, July 6th 2011 – Having just pushed a draft executive order to establish total administrative censorship of the Internet, the French government is now attempting to extend Net filtering, this time through a bill on consumer protection. Tonight and tomorrow, the bill will go through the French Parliament's Committee on Economic Affairs. The latter must absolutely reject this new attempt to control the Net. French citizens can help defend the Internet by calling the members of the Committee.

Citizens, Artists and Consumers in Favour of the Legal Recognition of File Sharing

The Création-Public-Internet (CPI) platform brings together consumer, artist and citizen organisations such as La Quadrature du Net in France. Today, the CPI is launching a campaign for the legal recognition of not-for profit file sharing between individuals and for instituting new statutory resource pooling for the fair and democratically governed financing of digital creation.

Like in Mexico, Parliaments Must Reject ACTA

Paris, June 23rd, 2011 - The Mexican Senate approved a resolution calling on the government not to sign the anti-counterfeiting agreement ACTA. La Quadrature calls on French and European Members of Parliament to do the same.

The Netherlands Vote In Favour Of Net Neutrality. Next, Europe?

Paris, June 22, 2011 – Today's vote in the Dutch parliament of a law protecting the freedom of the Internet 1 is excellent news and an example for all of Europe and France. The adopted text bans operators from discriminating their users' communications, for instance by slowing or blocking specific content or services.

French Constitutional Council Validates Internet Censorship

Paris, March 10th, 2011 — The French Constitutional Council has released its decision1 regarding the LOPPSI bill. Judges held that article 4 of the bill, which allows the executive branch to censor the Net under the pretext of fighting child pornography, is not contrary to the Constitution. In doing so, the constitutional court has failed to protect fundamental freedoms on the Internet, and in particular freedom of expression. Hopes lie now in European institutions, which are the only ones with the power to prohibit or at least supervise administrative website blocking and its inherent risks of abuse.

French Parliament to Consider Net Neutrality Law


Update (March 1st) : The bill on Net Neutrality was rejected by 311 vs. 218. Nevertheless, all the French Members of Parliament who spoke ahead of the vote agreed on the necessity to keep on working on the issue in order to enact a legislative protection of Net neutrality.

French Government Wants to Sacrifice Net Neutrality

Paris, 8 February 2011 – French Minister for Digital Economy, Éric Besson, has called for an end to Net Neutrality, a principle on which there seemed to be consensus among French and European decision-makers1. By giving telecom operators the possibility to sell prioritized access to the network, the government would put an end to equality among Internet users. Time after time, Nicolas Sarkozy's vision of the “Civilized Internet” that he is promoting at the G8/G20 level is coming to light: an Internet controlled by the State and by telecommunications and entertainment industries, while fundamental liberties are shunted to the side.

The Pirate Bay Decision, or the Political Persecution of Sharing

The Internet, November 27th 2010 - The decision to sentence the co-founders of The Pirate Bay to jail is both absurd and unfair. It illustrates how an obsolete copyright law and its indiscrimate application are harmful to society as a whole. Such an incomprehension of technological, economic and social realities should not mask the fact that this decision is above all political.

ACTA: Game Over?

Paris, September 24th 2010 - The Tokyo round of negotiations on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement has just begun. It could be the last one before the signature of the final agreement. The text, which is now close to completion, remains an alarming threat on fundamental freedoms online, and could lead to the generalization of anti-democratic legislation and governance.

EU liberals join Sarkozysts in online repression

Paris, September 16th 2010 - The Gallo report on copyright enforcement -from the pro-Sarkozy MEP, Marielle Gallo- will be voted on Wednesday, September 22nd in the European Parliament. Surprisingly, the Liberal ALDE group has tabled its own alternative resolution, a bad and almost equally repressive text. Under blatant influence of the producers and publishers' lobbies, this political move from the liberals actually aims at facilitating the vote of the original Gallo report.

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