News

French telecom regulation authority criticizes Olivennes law

The French economic newspaper Les Échos reports, that ARCEP, the French authority for telecom regulation, recently released a notice critical of the Olivennes law project.

ARCEP considers that, given the current state of technology, Internet Service Providers cannot implement the three strike measures.

First, ARCEP "suggests a delay of several months before the law comes into effect", because the Internet service providers will have to build new tools to ensure their judiciary security.

1984: The amendments on the Telecoms Package are killing fundamental freedoms

1984: The amendments on the Telecoms Package are killing fundamental freedoms

Brussels – Guy Bono is indignant about the freedom-killing amendments that have been submitted in the framework of the “Telecoms Package”, that is currently being discussed in the European Parliament.

Mutualised schemes for the funding of and reward to creative activities

Nota for English speaking-readers: the notion of a mutualised scheme is less familiar in English than in Latin languages (in part because of the use of "mutual" for companies). We use this expression for schemes where every potential user contributes equally to the funding of a global ecosystem of activities.

Two imperatives

  1. Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.

Privacy : Film industry pirates European law

Paris May 13, 2008 - La Quadrature du Net (Squaring the Net) is worried about amendments endangering privacy tabled by the rapporteurs of the Culture Committee of the European Parliament. They fit into the consideration of two proposals framework directives known as "Telecoms Package" [1].

Exclusive : The latest "flexible response" french law draft

Paris, May 6, 2008. La Quadrature du Net (Squaring the Net) has obtained the latest version of the French Olivennes bill about "flexible response" against internet users, which is currently being studied by the State Council. [1] Its content is further evidence for the extremism of its drafters.

Digital repression : record industry talks nonsense

Paris, April 30th, 2008. Hervé Rony, spokesperson for the SNEP (french syndicate of the record industry), declared yesterday that « it would not be acceptable » that the "flexible response" would not be examined before summer by the French Parliament. He added that it would be «  a bit late  if the Olivennes law was voted before the end of July [1].

Spanish internet users go to the front line

In Spain, the project of Nicolas Sarkozy to extend at European level flexible response (three strikes approach) makes a noise. The spanish press informs the public about the emergence of an international opposition.

International support for La Quadrature du Net

Paris, April 28, 2008 The French organization "La Quadrature du Net" (Squaring the Net) is pleased to announce the support of 15 French, European and international organizations.These organizations join La Quadrature du Net in their fight to prevent a possible law, that would ban internet access for presumed copyright-infringing users.

They fear that france could use its upcoming presidency of the European Council to push europe towards such a directive and therefore back into a digital medieval age.

Will France Introduce the Digital Guillotine in Europe?

Ever since DADVSI, the French implementation of the European Copyright Directive, Internet users in France have faced increasingly disproportionate threats of punishment for claims of copyright infringement. The latest scheme promoted by the content industry against unauthorized sharing of music and films on Internet is called "flexible response" or "three strikes, you're dead".

European Parliament rejects graduated response

Paris, Thursday, April 10. The European Parliament adopted a resolution this morning which commits the member states - therefore France - "to avoid adopting measures conflicting with civil liberties and human rights and with the principles of proportionality, effectiveness and dissuasiveness, such as the interruption of Internet access."[1] This vote proves that the system of graduated response that Nicolas Sarkozy wants France to adopt quickly and to extend to Europe during the French Presidency of the EU, is seen as contrary to human rights by a majority of MEPs.

Squaring the Net in Washington Internet Daily

Reproduced by permission of Warren Communications News, Inc., 800-771-9202, www.warren-news.com


A new French citizens' lobbying group wants public debate on Internet-related regulation affecting human rights and freedoms, one of its organizers told us Friday. "Squaring the Net" (La quadrature du net) hopes to help spur a "societal movement which we feel is ready to develop," said Philippe Aigrain, director of the Society for Public Information Spaces.

No internet hunt by private companies in Italy

The Italian authority for protection of personal data stated in a press release dated March 13, 2008, that private companies could not legally monitor peer to peer traffic to identify and prosecute users of these networks.

This position of the Italian follows the Peppermint case in which a German company had commissioned a Swiss company in order to raise the IPs of people making available copyrighted works on which it was the right holder.

A swedish ISP refuses to filter the Pirate Bay

The largest provider of Sweden has refused to comply to a request by the IFPI (International Federation of Phonographic Industry) asking it to filter access to the torrent site The Pirate Bay.It should be recalled that the IFPI has launched a campaign some time ago to require Internet providers to filter access to P2P sites. This campaign successfully obtained a court order requiring TELE2 to block access to the famous site which features a pirate galleon as its emblem.

Squaring the Net : the debate is open.

Permanent link: http://www.laquadrature.net/the-debate-is-open

Paris, March 26, 2008. While the Olivennes bill [0] aimed at building the "graduated response" must be voted before the summer in France, a group of citizens launched "Squaring the Net" to alert on this and other equally disturbing governmental projects, and to make alternative proposals.

Since the beginning of the year, the french government has announced various projects relating to Internet:

Squaring the Net, op-ed by Christophe Espern

The French parliament will soon debate a draft law "about the High Authority for the dissemination of works and protection of the rights on the internet". The project incorporates the recommendations made by the then CEO of FNAC (biggest CD and DVD retail stores in France), Denis Olivennes. One of the key measures is to sanction a violation of copyright by cutting access to the Internet.