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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[TechDirt] License Plate Reader Company Sues Another State For 'Violating' Its First Amendment Right To Build A 1.8-Billion-Image Database

Private companies engaging in large-scale surveillance are [...] filing lawsuits alleging their First Amendment right to photograph license plates is being infringed on by state laws forbidding the use of automatic license plate readers by private companies.

[...] Vigilant [a private company] has filed another lawsuit, this time against the state of Arkansas, arguing that a state law curbing the use of LPRs [licence plate readers] by private companies tampers with its free speech rights. [...]

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20140613/09224127569/license-plate-rea...

[NYTimes] British Spy Agencies Are Said to Assert Power to Intercept Web Traffic

In a broad legal rationale for collecting information from Internet use by its citizens, the British government has reportedly asserted the right to intercept communications that go through services like Facebook, Google and Twitter that are based in the United States or other foreign nations, even if they are between people in Britain. The British position is described in a draft summary of a report to be released Tuesday by Privacy International and other advocacy groups. The summary, seen by The New York Times, says the findings are based on a government document that the groups obtained through a lawsuit. […]

When revelations surrounding Prism and the other surveillance activities first occurred last year, the British government said the country’s intelligence agencies abided by local rules aimed at protecting citizens’ privacy. But the legal defense reflected in the draft summary of the privacy groups’ report would be the most detailed discussion that has surfaced of the government’s approach to collecting individuals’ communications on some of the most popular Internet services.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/17/business/international/british-spy-age...

[CIO] What Does the New EU Parliament Mean for Tech?

More than 400 candidates to the Parliament pledged to defend net neutrality and data privacy, signing a 10-point digital rights charter called WePromiseEU. Votes were still being counted Monday, but by late afternoon, 55 candidates for Pariament who had signed WePromiseEU were confirmed as elected. [...]

The WePromiseEU pledge includes a commitment to fight against the idea of service providers being held accountable for monitoring illegal downloads, and against blanket, unchecked surveillance measures. It also includes a pledge to try to ensure that European surveillance technology is not sold to despotic regimes. [...]

Meanwhile questions are being asked about which MEPs will sit on which Parliamentary committees and how that will affect tech policy. Along with copyright reform, the new Parliament will also have to negotiate a new data protection regulation and a new telecom package, which comprises rules on roaming charges. This could prove a challenge for privacy advocates and those who support measures to ensure low roaming charges, as many member states, in particular the U.K., want to water down current rules. [...]

http://www.cio.com/article/753207/What_Does_the_New_EU_Parliament_Mean_f...

[TheRegister] CIA rendition jet was waiting in Europe to SNATCH SNOWDEN

As the whistleblowing NSA sysadmin Edward Snowden made his dramatic escape to Russia a year ago, a secret US government jet - previously employed in CIA "rendition" flights on which terror suspects disappeared into invisible "black" imprisonment - flew into Europe in a bid to spirit him back to America, the Register can reveal. [...]

With its new tail number N977GA the plane became part of the Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation Systems (JPATS), operated by US Marshals. On perhaps its best-known mission, the jet flew a team of marshals into the UK on 5 October 2012 to collect radical cleric Abu Hamza after the USA won an extradition order against him.

Only Vladimir Putin's intransigence saved Snowden from a similar travel package, complete with free one-way ticket home and fitting for a stylish new orange outfit. Abu Hamza was last seen waving goodbye from a back window on N977GA. [...]

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/06/13/cia_rendition_jet_was_waiting_in...

[Reuters] Factbox: What is net neutrality? U.S. debates once again

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is collecting public comments until Sept. 10 on new "net neutrality" or "open Internet rules" that may let service providers charge content companies for faster and more reliable delivery of their traffic to users.

Net neutrality is a principle that says Internet service providers should treat all traffic on their networks equally. That means companies like Comcast Corp or Verizon Communications Inc should not block or slow down access to any website or content on the Web - for instance, to benefit their own services over those of competitors. [...]

Consumer advocates say Wheeler's proposal would create "fast lanes" for companies willing to pay while leaving startups and others behind, which would potentially harm competition. More than 100 technology companies including Google Inc, Facebook Inc and Amazon.com Inc have warned of a "grave threat to the Internet." However, consumer advocates are pushing for reclassification of broadband providers as public utilities, while tech companies in their opposition to pay-for-priority have not supported reclassification. [...]

Internet providers say stricter net neutrality regulations could discourage investment in the expensive network infrastructure. Verizon, in its case against the FCC, argued that the rules amounted to government overreach into companies' business dealings. [...]

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/06/15/us-usa-internet-neutrality-fac...

[MotherJones] Verizon Says It Wants to Kill Net Neutrality to Help Blind, Deaf, and Disabled People

Lobbyists are telling Congress that the administration's plan to create internet fast lanes and slow lanes is important for Americans with disabilities. [...]

Three Hill sources tell Mother Jones that Verizon lobbyists have cited the needs of blind, deaf, and disabled people to try to convince congressional staffers and their bosses to get on board with the fast lane idea. But groups representing disabled Americans, including the National Association of the Deaf, the National Federation of the Blind, and the American Association of People with Disabilities are not advocating for this plan. Mark Perriello, the president and CEO of the AAPD, says that this is the "first time" he has heard "these specific talking points." [...]

Defenders of net neutrality are more cynical. The Verizon lobbyists' argument is "disingenuous," says Matt Wood, a policy director at Free Press, an Internet freedom advocacy group. The FCC says that even if the agency doesn't go through with its fast lane proposal, companies that serve disabled people would still be able to pay internet service providers for faster service. [...]

The decision the FCC makes in the coming months could "change the course of the Internet for a long time to come," says Michael Copps, who served as an FCC commissioner from 2001 to 2011, "perhaps in ways that will be impossible to reverse."

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/06/verizon-comcast-net-neutrali...

[Arstechnica] Ars tests Internet surveillance - by spying on an NPR reporter

Interesting article that summarises the findings of serious data leakage on mobile devices, google searches and other. A great read if you want to know a bit more about how much data leaking you're probably doing.

http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/06/what-the-nsa-or-anyone-can-learn...

[BBC] Deal to combat piracy in UK with 'alerts' is imminent

After years of wrangling, a deal between entertainment industry bodies and UK internet service providers to help combat piracy is imminent. [...]

Instead, letters sent to suspected infringers must be "educational" in tone, "promoting an increase in awareness" of legal downloading services. The rights holders have agreed to pay £750,000 towards each internet service provider (ISP) to set up the system, or 75% of the total costs, whichever is smaller. [...]

In a joint statement, the BPI and MPA said: "Content creators and ISPs, with the support of government, have been exploring the possibility of developing an awareness programme that will support the continuing growth of legal creative content services, reduce copyright infringement and create the best possible customer experience online."

The groups declined to comment specifically on the leaked document. The four ISPs involved all confirmed that they were in discussion. [...]

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-27330150

[PolicyReview] US Communications Commission decision to fuel further fight in the EU

Digital rights activists hailed the European Parliament's April 2014 vote in favour of net neutrality and called it a hard fought success. Yet the dice are still rolling and the much debated US Federal Communication Commission's move of 15 May 2014 favouring a dichotomy of regular and specialised services may well serve those asking for ‘balance’ between the net neutrality principle and the protection of telecom investment, not the least EU governments. The status report of the Hellenic presidency for this week's telecom Council clearly illustrates that net neutrality is far from approved in the EU. [...]

Michael Fries, CEO of UK-based Liberty Global, said at the ANGA Cable opening panel that net neutrality was an important, but misunderstood topic. Certainly nobody wanted to stop users from going wherever they wanted, but at the same time network providers had to calculate the cost for building the highways. Added Fries: “We will never be a dumb pipe because we are investing in that user interface and we are investing in a whole series of activities from broadband to video to mobile.”

http://policyreview.info/articles/news/us-communications-commission-deci...

[PolicyReview] French parliament forms a committee on digital affairs

After years of being in reactive mode, the French parliament has just decided to set up a Commission du numérique (Committee on digital affairs). This should help French legislators come up with a set of principles meant to guide future legislation impacting the internet’s use and innovation. The timing of the newly-created multi-party and multi-stakeholder committee says everything on the role this committee will play for the future of French and, to a certain extent, European internet policy.

One year after the Snowden revelations on surveillance, in the midst of the European debate on network neutrality (and the latest net neutrality ruling by the US Communications Commission FCC) and as tens of thousands of requests flood Google in the ‘right to be forgotten’ dossier, the government of Premier Manuel Valls is expected to introduce, in the coming year, a bill on the protection of internet-related rights and freedoms. [...]

http://policyreview.info/articles/news/french-parliament-forms-committee...

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