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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
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[Think Broadband] MEPs say anti-piracy plans conflict with human rights

The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) has said the amendment was badly drafted and a contradiction to the contents of the full report.

"We look forward to a full discussion in the European Parliament in the coming months on how best to address copyright theft online"
The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI)

As the law stands, media rights owners can take individuals to court over copyright infringement, but this path is generally slow and may for the average file sharer cost more to pursue than the sales lost from the sharing. The discussion in the UK is generally around a set of laws not unlike what France is to implement, whereby those found sharing copyright material without permission will receive warnings via their Internet service provider and face eventual disconnection.

http://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/3502-meps-say-anti-piracy-plans-confl...

[Silicon] Europe: Don't ban internet file-sharers

People should not be criminalised for the file-sharing of copyrighted material if they are not profiting from doing so, the European Parliament has recommended.

At the end of last week the parliament voted through two reports on the cultural industries. Both contained amendments that were directly related to the ongoing argument between the content industry and internet service provider. In this conflict, the ISPs are claiming they should not have to disconnect those users who are persistent file-sharers, but the content industry is calling for a "three strikes and you're out" rule in order to protect intellectual property.

The argument encompasses not only the prospect of users being "banned" from internet use but also the deep packet inspection techniques that would have to be employed in order to catch them.

http://management.silicon.com/government/0,39024677,39187851,00.htm

[CNET] EU warns against 'criminalising' filesharers

People should not be criminalised for the file-sharing of copyrighted material if they are not profiting from doing so, the European Parliament has recommended.

On Thursday, the parliament voted through two reports on the cultural industries. Both contained amendments that were directly related to the ongoing argument between the content industry and Internet service provider (ISPs). In this conflict, the ISPs are claiming that they should not have to disconnect those users who are persistent filesharers, but the content industry is calling for a "three strikes and you're out" rule in order to protect intellectual property.

http://news.cnet.co.uk/digitalmusic/0,39029666,49296493,00.htm

[Management Consultancy] MEPs vote against illegal downloading ban

European MPs have voted down a proposal to impose internet banning orders on individuals who illegally download content.

The move conflicts with a UK government plans for a three strike system against illegal downloaders.

"The vote shows that MEPs want to strike a balance between the interests of rights holders and those of consumers, and that big measures like cutting off internet access shouldn't be used," said a spokeswoman for the European Parliament after the vote.

http://www.managementconsultancy.co.uk/computing/news/2214145/meps-peopl...

[New York Times] In Europe, a Push to Take Away Piracy Suspects’ Internet Access

PARIS — Prodded by the music industry and government, some Internet service providers are reluctantly exploring the adoption of a shunning ritual as 21st century punishment: banishing errant online users.

But even as service providers test “three strikes” warning systems that can result in the disconnection of Internet users who are thought to have illegally downloaded copyrighted music or movies, resistance is building.

Lawmakers in the European Parliament, in a symbolic vote Thursday, expressed their opposition to the approach, which has been championed by President Nicolas Sarkozy of France and explored by governments of other countries. Consumer groups are also fighting such proposals.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/14/business/worldbusiness/14isp.html?_r=1...

[BBC] Europe rejects anti-piracy plans

European politicians have voted down calls to throw suspected file-sharers off the net.

The idea to cut off persistent pirates formed part of a wide-ranging report on creative industries written for the European parliament.

But in a narrow vote MEPs backed an amendment to the report which said net bans conflicted with "civil liberties and human rights".

It puts MEPS at odds with governments planning tough action against pirates.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7342135.stm

[ITPro] EU rejects file-sharing laws

The European Parliament threw out attempts to criminalise file sharing in a plenary vote yesterday.

Although not legally binding, the 'no' vote is expected to hamper plans on the part of some governments in Europe to introduce a 'three-strikes' rule that would force internet service providers (ISPs) to ban users found sharing copyrighted files of music, TV shows or films via peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. [...]

Malene Folke Chaucheprat, a European Parliament spokeswoman said: "The vote shows that MEPs want to strike a balance between the interests of rights holders and those of consumers and that big measures like cutting off internet access shouldn't be used."

http://www.itpro.co.uk/news/186843/eu-rejects-filesharing-laws.html

[The Inquirer] EU Parliament rejects file sharing ban

THE EU PARLIAMENT narrowly threw out a vote that would have banned file sharing by private individuals and decided against banning copyright abusers from the Internet.

314 Members of the European Parliament voted for an amendment that killed off a bill that would have protected copyright over the Internet. 297 voted against the amendment.

A European Parliament spokeswoman told Information World that MEPs wanted to strike a balance between the rights of rights holders and those of consumers.

The move has been at the instigation of France, which already has similar laws in place. It wanted to have a three strikes law which means that offenders lose the right to an Internet account after being caught sharing copyright-protected music over the Internet for a third time.

http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/04/11/eu-parliament-rej...

[Free Software Daily] European Parliament rejects graduated response

"The European Parliament adopted a resolution this morning which commits the member states - therefore France - «to avoid adopting measures conflicting with civil liberties and human rights and with the principles of proportionality, effectiveness and dissuasiveness, such as the interruption of Internet access.» This vote proves that the system of graduated response that Nicolas Sarkozy wants France to adopt quickly and to extend to Europe during the French Presidency of the EU, is seen as contrary to human rights by a majority of MEPs..."

http://www.fsdaily.com/Legal/European_Parliament_rejects_graduated_response

[ITWeek] EU votes to protect file sharing

The parliament was voting on the Bono Report on the Cultural Industries, which examined the development of culture and intellectual property in the Union. Swedish MEP Christofer Fjellner and the former Prime Minister of France, Michel Rocard put in a last minute amendment saying that a three strike rule would:

"[conflict] with civil liberties and human rights and with the principles of proportionality, effectiveness and dissuasiveness, such as the interruption of Internet access".

The amended bill squeaked through, 314 in favour to 297 against, against a background of heavy lobbying from both sides.

"The European Parliament's file-sharer friendly statement is well timed," said Karl Sigfrid, a Swedish national MP, in his blog.

"France will soon get the opportunity to chair the EU, and one priority will be to force European ISPs to cut the internet connection of anyone illegally downloading a song or a movie. If insisting on his plans, Sarkozy now faces an uphill battle."

http://www.itweek.co.uk/vnunet/news/2214169/eu-votes-protect-file-sharing

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