Christine Albanel

Christine Albanel, ministre de la Culture et de la Communication

Solemn burial for HADOPI in French National Assembly

Paris, 12 May 2009 - French "HADOPI" law implementing "three strikes" policy was adopted by a short majority in National Assembly, after a previous rejection on April 9th1. Members of the majority right-wing party of N. Sarkozy, under high pressure, voted this obsolete text, massively rejected by public opinion and directly opposed by Europe. This legislative process' debacle, along with an "hadopigate" case2, opens the way to credible solutions for funding creation in the digital age that have to be compatible with civil liberties3. HADOPI is stillborn, the debate shall begin!

How French Presidency Hides a Political Laundering Inside EU Telecoms Package

Everybody agrees that European Union suffers from a democratic deficit which deepens the gap between European institutions and their citizens. What is more unknown is that one of main reasons for this is that Member States often use European Union to achieve what can be spelled as “political laundering”. The “Telecoms Package” gives a perfect example of such a deceptive maneuver, aimed at legalizing an european-wide "graduated response" against citizens, and stretching it even deeper as usual. How does it work?

Commission accepts amendment 138 against graduated response

The European Commission accepts amendment 138 (Bono/Cohn-Bendit/Roithova) against the french "graduated response", one week after the French law is unanimously voted in first reading by the French Senate.

Graduated response: Europe must resist Sarkozy's authoritarianism

A letter from Nicolas Sarkozy to the president of European Commission, Jose-Manuel Barroso, has been published today on the website ecrans.fr.[1] Sarkozy begs Barroso to reject Bono/Cohn-Bendit/Roithova amendment (amendment 138) adopted by 88% of the Members of European Parliament (MEPs) during the first reading of the Telecoms package.[2]

France legislature's rejection of internet anti-piracy bill thwarts corporate interests

The controversial HADOPI bill against filesharing was rejected by the French National Assembly in a very surprising move last week, at the final vote of the emergency procedure in which it was considered, with only one reading in each chamber. Such a last minute rejection happened for the last time in 1983, and is a strong political blow for Nicolas Sarkozy and his minister Albanel. This law faced strong opposition coming from members of all the political parties, driven by a formidable and wide citizen movement lead from the Internet by La Quadrature du Net and others. The law is nonsensical, inapplicable and dangerous for numerous reasons: It allows for parallel administrative justice where innocents will be sanctioned based on immaterial proofs, private police of the network in the hands of corporate actors, and its Article 5 opens very disturbing doors to generalized filtering of content.

HADOPI, French "three strikes" law rejected!

Paris, April 9, 2009 - In a surprising turn of events, the national assembly has rejected the HADOPI bill creating the "three strikes" scheme in France, in the final discussion, by a vote of 15 in favour and 21 opposed.

The European Parliament rejects "graduated response"... for the third time

Paris, 26 March 2009 - The European Parliament, endorsing the Lambrinidis report1 and turning its back on all the amendments supported by the French government and defended by Jacques Toubon and Jean-Marie Cavada, has just rejected "graduated response" for the third time.

French Net black-out against "graduated response"

Paris, February, 25th. Opposing the stubborn and ridiculous will of the French governement to disconnect whole families from the Internet without real proof or trial, La Quadrature du Net issues a call to all freedom-cherishing citizens to a "black-out" of their sites, blogs, profiles, avatars,...

"graduated response": "White list" for a dark age of the Net in France.

Paris, Feb. 23rd - The French minister of Culture in charge of the law setting up "graduated response" against filesharers ("HADOPI" or "Olivennes Law", or "Création et Internet") announced that public wifi hotspots will have to be filtered to allow only access to a "white list" of authorised sites. This is the paroxysm of the absurd logic of this law, dangerous and doomed to fail. This is a perfect example of how a repressive and ignorant legislation can lead to terrible regression for the growth and innovation of our digital societies.

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