radio spectrum

EU Parliament Adopts Open Wireless Communications Policy

Paris, May 11th, 2011 – Today, the European Parliament adopted a bill planning out EU spectrum policy for the years to come, including very important amendments in favor of an open access to airwaves. By supporting shared and unlicensed use of spectrum, the Parliament paves the way for the development of the next generations of free wireless Internet communications (“next generation WiFi”). This strong stance in favor of a communications policy promoting innovation and democracy now needs to be approved by EU Member States (via the EU Council) and the Commission.

EU Parliament Calls for Free Wireless Communications

Paris, April 12th, 2011 - The Industry Committee of the European Parliament has adopted amendments to the EU Spectrum Policy Programme allowing for a free use of airwaves for citizens, which will lead to the development of the next generations of free wireless Internet communications (“next generation WiFi”). This vote is encouraging and must be confirmed in plenary, despite the pressure that broadcasters and telecoms industries will inevitably put on the European Parliament to keep airwaves under control.

Voting For a Free and Open Wireless Internet

Next Tuesday, April 12th, the EU Parliament Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) will hold a major vote for the future of wireless communications in the European Union. By amending the radio spectrum policy programme proposed by the European Commission, Members of the Parliament have an opportunity to boost wireless Internet access. By encouraging shared and unlicensed uses of the spectrum, they can create the next generation of WiFi networks that will improve access to the Internet in urban as well as rural communities, and launch the next wave of innovation in mobile communications. But the risk is for Europe to give in to media or telecoms corporations who would like to control the airwaves – a public resource. La Quadrature calls on EU citizens and NGOs to step into this important debate on the future of our communications system, which forms the structure of our democratic societies.

Study Calls on EU Regulators to Free Up the Airwaves

The European Commission released a ground-breaking study on shared access to radio spectrum. The study, conducted by SCF Associates Ltd, calls for a sweeping reform of wireless communications policies, so as to free up more airwaves and pave the way for "super-WiFi" networks. The EU is severely lagging behind the US when it comes to adapting spectrum policy to new needs and possibilities, and this study should sound as a wake-up call for policy-makers.

Turncoat EU Parliament Gives Up on Defending Free Wireless Communications

Update: February 15th, 2012 – The European Parliament as a whole formally adopted the Radio Spectrum Policy Programme

Paris, November 9th, 2011 — In discussions on the future of wireless communications policies, the EU Parliament is giving in to Member States by accepting a watered-down version1 of the Radio Spectrum Policy Programme. Last Spring, the Parliament had made very constructive proposals in favour of open spectrum policies, calling2 for citizen-controlled wireless communications. Sadly, the first major effort to harmonise spectrum policy in Europe is being held back by EU governments' conservatism and the Parliament's surrender.

EU Governments Oppose an Open Wireless Infrastructure

Paris, October 11th, 2011 - As the European Union engages in important discussions on the future of the radio spectrum policy - i.e the future of open wireless communications -, it's becoming clear that national governments are aligned on the position of dominant telecom operators. To protect open wireless communications operated and controlled by citizens, the EU Parliament must resist the pressure and defend its position.

The Spectrum Of Our Freedoms

What if Internet users were more than just users? Given the possibility of taking up the airwaves, they could become not just content providers, but also access providers. We would then be more than mere consumers, and the Internet's acentered and multipolar architecture would be preserved.

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