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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[Broadband Finder] Europe: File-sharers will not lose connection

Broadband users who are caught sharing files should not lose their internet connection according to European politicians who threw out the suggestion, reports the BBC.

It had been proposed that consumers caught pirating material such as songs or films would not be able to continue using the internet - with the service providers policing usage.

However, as French broadband users prepare to face tougher action against piracy, the European Parliament voted in an amendment to the bill on the issue, which claimed that banning users was against civil liberties.

A spokesperson is reported as saying: "The vote shows that MEPs want to strike a balance between the interests of rights holders and those of consumers, and that big measures like cutting off internet access shouldn't be used."

Earlier in the year, the BBC reported that UK internet providers said that they were unable to fulfill a government request to closely monitor broadband usage, with the Internet Service Providers Association explaining that they are not responsible for network traffic.

http://www.broadband-finder.co.uk/news/broadband/europe-filesharers-will...

[PC Advisor] EU votes against punishing illegal file-sharers

The European Parliament is not backing plans to ban illegal file-sharers from the internet.

The plans suggested ISPs should monitor customers and implement a 'three strikes' rule that would see offenders issued with written warnings and even possible suspension if they continue to download pirate software.

However MEPs backed an amendment to the report, which claimed banning web users conflicted with "civil liberties and human rights".

http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/index.cfm?newsid=12719

[Broadband Choice] EU against 'three strikes' piracy policy

The BBC reported that MEPs had narrowly voted to amend the plans, saying that internet bans conflicted with “civil liberties and human rights”.

The amendment recommends that those downloading illegal files not be criminalised unless they profit from it.

“The vote shows that MEPs want to strike a balance between the interests of rights holders and those of consumers, and that big measures like cutting off internet access shouldn't be used,” a spokeswoman for the European Parliament told the BBC.

A number of European governments including Britain and France had proposed tough legislation to fight online piracy that costs the music and movie industry billions of pounds.

http://www.broadbandchoices.co.uk/eu-against-three-strikes-piracy-policy...

[Think Broadband] MEPs say anti-piracy plans conflict with human rights

The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) has said the amendment was badly drafted and a contradiction to the contents of the full report.

"We look forward to a full discussion in the European Parliament in the coming months on how best to address copyright theft online"
The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI)

As the law stands, media rights owners can take individuals to court over copyright infringement, but this path is generally slow and may for the average file sharer cost more to pursue than the sales lost from the sharing. The discussion in the UK is generally around a set of laws not unlike what France is to implement, whereby those found sharing copyright material without permission will receive warnings via their Internet service provider and face eventual disconnection.

http://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/3502-meps-say-anti-piracy-plans-confl...

[Silicon] Europe: Don't ban internet file-sharers

People should not be criminalised for the file-sharing of copyrighted material if they are not profiting from doing so, the European Parliament has recommended.

At the end of last week the parliament voted through two reports on the cultural industries. Both contained amendments that were directly related to the ongoing argument between the content industry and internet service provider. In this conflict, the ISPs are claiming they should not have to disconnect those users who are persistent file-sharers, but the content industry is calling for a "three strikes and you're out" rule in order to protect intellectual property.

The argument encompasses not only the prospect of users being "banned" from internet use but also the deep packet inspection techniques that would have to be employed in order to catch them.

http://management.silicon.com/government/0,39024677,39187851,00.htm

[CNET] EU warns against 'criminalising' filesharers

People should not be criminalised for the file-sharing of copyrighted material if they are not profiting from doing so, the European Parliament has recommended.

On Thursday, the parliament voted through two reports on the cultural industries. Both contained amendments that were directly related to the ongoing argument between the content industry and Internet service provider (ISPs). In this conflict, the ISPs are claiming that they should not have to disconnect those users who are persistent filesharers, but the content industry is calling for a "three strikes and you're out" rule in order to protect intellectual property.

http://news.cnet.co.uk/digitalmusic/0,39029666,49296493,00.htm

[Management Consultancy] MEPs vote against illegal downloading ban

European MPs have voted down a proposal to impose internet banning orders on individuals who illegally download content.

The move conflicts with a UK government plans for a three strike system against illegal downloaders.

"The vote shows that MEPs want to strike a balance between the interests of rights holders and those of consumers, and that big measures like cutting off internet access shouldn't be used," said a spokeswoman for the European Parliament after the vote.

http://www.managementconsultancy.co.uk/computing/news/2214145/meps-peopl...

[New York Times] In Europe, a Push to Take Away Piracy Suspects’ Internet Access

PARIS — Prodded by the music industry and government, some Internet service providers are reluctantly exploring the adoption of a shunning ritual as 21st century punishment: banishing errant online users.

But even as service providers test “three strikes” warning systems that can result in the disconnection of Internet users who are thought to have illegally downloaded copyrighted music or movies, resistance is building.

Lawmakers in the European Parliament, in a symbolic vote Thursday, expressed their opposition to the approach, which has been championed by President Nicolas Sarkozy of France and explored by governments of other countries. Consumer groups are also fighting such proposals.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/14/business/worldbusiness/14isp.html?_r=1...

[BBC] Europe rejects anti-piracy plans

European politicians have voted down calls to throw suspected file-sharers off the net.

The idea to cut off persistent pirates formed part of a wide-ranging report on creative industries written for the European parliament.

But in a narrow vote MEPs backed an amendment to the report which said net bans conflicted with "civil liberties and human rights".

It puts MEPS at odds with governments planning tough action against pirates.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7342135.stm

[ITPro] EU rejects file-sharing laws

The European Parliament threw out attempts to criminalise file sharing in a plenary vote yesterday.

Although not legally binding, the 'no' vote is expected to hamper plans on the part of some governments in Europe to introduce a 'three-strikes' rule that would force internet service providers (ISPs) to ban users found sharing copyrighted files of music, TV shows or films via peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. [...]

Malene Folke Chaucheprat, a European Parliament spokeswoman said: "The vote shows that MEPs want to strike a balance between the interests of rights holders and those of consumers and that big measures like cutting off internet access shouldn't be used."

http://www.itpro.co.uk/news/186843/eu-rejects-filesharing-laws.html

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