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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[ProItZone] FireFox And Skype Could Be Declared Illegal Products

A new EU anti-piracy law incorporates elements that could affect the development of the digital world in coming years.

The law, known as Telecom Packet, the difficults the live of pirates with the law called "three-strike". The law at issue three warnings apply to users who downloaded illegal material before expelled from the Internet.

"The laws allow private companies monitor Internet traffic and filters," explains Christophe Espern, the French defence group for privacy and digital rights The Quadrature du Net.

...

http://www.proitzone.com/2008/07/11/firefox-and-skype-could-be-declared-il=

[P2P.net] Big Music vs The Winds of Change

Making laws in the European Union is a long, complicated and often tedious process that involves a delicate ballet featuring the Council of Ministers, the Parliament and the Commission.

Several amendments from British MEP Syed Kamall, a member of the Conservative group, have been criticised by those campaigning for a more open net, including a change to Article 21 (4a) that asks member states to oblige them to “distribute public interest information to existing and new subscribers when appropriate. Such information shall be produced by the relevant public authorities in a standardised format” and may include “Illegal uses of electronic communications networks” including infringement of copyright and related rights”

This reads like a call for a public information campaign, but observers like the UK-based Open Rights Group and the French-based La Quadrature du Net believe it would oblige ISPs to contact subscribers when they are accused of transmitting licensed content without permission, for example when using file-sharing networks or downloading from unauthorised sources.

Another amendment put forward by Kamall allows that ‘traffic data may be processed’ to ensure the security of a public electronic communication service’, which the campaigners read as giving carte blanche to the content providers to monitor and control what happens on the network on the grounds that copying files or breaking digital rights management counts as a ’security’ breach.

http://www.p2pnet.net/story/16338

[EurActiv] EU Parliament split over electronic data protection

Last November, the European Commission proposed a wide review of the rules on EU electronic communications, the so-called 'Telecoms package'. The proposals include upgrading the Directive Pdf external on personal data and protection of privacy for electronic services (see our Links Dossier).

Several parliamentary committees are involved in the dossier on data protection, but two have a binding say on framing the European Parliament's final text. These are the Internal Market and Civil Rights Committees.

The Council is expected to give its final opinion on the issue in November under the current French EU Presidency.

...

Behind this unusual rejection lies the LIBE Committee's intention to allow the processing of electronic traffic data by "any natural or legal person", without the consent of the user, if it is necessary for security purposes. Socialist and Green MEPs belonging to the IMCO Committee are not at ease with this wording.

Traffic data include several pieces of information which are considered private by many, particularly IP addresses (the first source of identity in the online world) and information relating to the duration, timing, volume and origins of an electronic communication.

Positions:

Civil liberty group 'Squaring the Net' says the LIBE Committee amendment represents "a major breach for the protection the protection of personal data and privacy, as it allows businesses to remotely control users' electronic communications without their consent". It adds that such a measure "paves the way for the deployment of intrusive technologies on the client".

A spokesperson for the IMCO Committee said that "some MEPs are not certain to accept in the plenary vote the amendments proposed by the LIBE Committee", underlining that there could be problems and that there might be a need "for more time".

Next steps:

* Sep. 2008: Vote on Telecoms package planned in the plenary, although disagreements over electronic data protection could delay the vote.

http://www.euractiv.com/en/infosociety/eu-parliament-split-electronic-da...

[EurActiv.com] EU Parliament split over electronic data protection | EU - European Information on InfoSociety

Proposed new rules on the management of traffic data for electronic services have sparked controversy in the European Parliament, potentially delaying the final vote on the Telecoms package.

Background:
Last November, the European Commission proposed a wide review of the rules on EU electronic communications, the so-called 'Telecoms package'. The proposals include upgrading the DirectivePdf external on personal data and protection of privacy for electronic services (see our Links Dossier).

Several parliamentary committees are involved in the dossier on data protection, but two have a binding say on framing the European Parliament's final text. These are the Internal Market and Civil Rights Committees.

The Council is expected to give its final opinion on the issue in November under the current French EU Presidency.

http://www.euractiv.com/en/infosociety/eu-parliament-split-electronic-da...

[ArsTechnica] Proposed EU telecom amendments lack three-strikes provision

Here's the story that's been making headlines in Europe over the last few days: the EU is getting ready to impose Internet traffic monitoring fit for a police state, might ban all peer-to-peer software, and is ready to implement a "three strikes and you're off the 'Net" policy for users sharing copyrighted files. Gross exaggerations, of course, but you wouldn't necessarily know that if you'd read the news sections of online rights groups, or even the website of the venerable BBC. The phrasing in these reports appear to have originated in press releases from two Internet privacy groups that have what can be charitably called an overheated take on some of the EU legislation's provisions.

Ambiguities, not communism

...

That ambiguity hasn't stopped a number of groups from drawing some very unambiguous conclusions about those provisions. The BBC report echoes the contentions of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure, which accused the European Parliament rushing towards a "Soviet Internet." That contention appears to be based on a provision on packet filtering. Benjamin Henrion, an FFI representative, also charged that the legislation will create some sort of software licensing authority. "Tomorrow," he stated, "popular software applications like Skype or even Firefox might be declared illegal in Europe if they are not certified by an administrative authority."

Those claims are reiterated and extended by the French group La Quadrature du Net, which issued an analysis (PDF) of several amendments last week. In addition to accusations of spying and censorship, the group decries a provision that they term "blackmail by e-mail." This would codify the use of warning letters sent to copyright infringers by ISPs. Oddly, these warning letters are conflated with the "three strikes" proposals, which would ban the infringers after repeated warnings. (The European Parliament rejected the idea of a widespread "three strikes" rule only a couple of months ago.)

...

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080709-proposed-eu-telecom-amendm...

[PC Advisor] Europe could cut off illegal file-sharers News

An amendment to a European telecommunications law could see illegal file sharers disconnected from the net.

Should the Telecom Packet proposals be passed by the European Parliament in September, the 'three strikes' recommendation, which would see illegal file sharers warned about their activities and possibly even disconnected if they continue to offend, would come into force across Europe.

http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/index.cfm?newsid=13659

[nu.nl] Europarlement boos over e-mailbombardement

STRAATSBURG - Europarlementsleden die zich bezighouden met de harmonisatie van Europese telecomwetgeving werden volgens Toine Manders (VVD) maandagavond overladen met agressieve e-mails.

http://www.nu.nl/news/1647218/52/Europarlement_boos_over_e-mailbombardem...

[heise.de] EU: Medienlobby scheitert mit ihrem Überwachungsvorstoß

Eine lückenlose Internetüberwachung, wie sie Konservative auf Drängen der Unterhaltungs- und Medienindustrie im Telekommunikations-Paket verankern wollten, wird es nicht geben. Abgeordnete des EU-Parlaments haben im Industrie-Ausschuss (ITRE) und Binnenmarkt-Ausschuss (IMCO) am gestrigen Montagabend über rund 1000 Änderungsanträge zum sogenannten Telecom-Paket abgestimmt, die in über 30 Kompromissvorschlägen zusammengefasst wurden. Dabei wurde der von der zuständigen Berichterstatterin Catherine Trautmann (Sozialisten) vorgelegte Kompromissvorschlag angenommen. Inzwischen soll es auch bei den Konservativen mehr Skepsis gegenüber einer "Internetüberwachung" geben.

http://www.heise.de/newsticker/EU-Medienlobby-scheitert-mit-ihrem-Ueberw...

[PocketLint] EU proposes crackdown on music and movie piracy

Proposals have been put before European authorities that could see ISPs adopting a far stricter policy towards internet users who illegally download copyrighted music and movie content.

The Telecom Packet includes the proposal of several laws that would see Europeans suspected of putting movies and music on file-sharing networks thrown off the web. A Europe-wide "three strikes" law could be made law which would see users banned from the web if they fail to heed three warnings that they are suspected of putting copyrighted works on file-sharing networks.

...

"[The amendments] pave the way for the monitoring and filtering of the internet by private companies, exceptional courts and Orwellian technical measures", said Christophe Espern, co-founder of French rights group La Quadrature du Net (Squaring the Net) in a statement. The Foundation for a Free Internet Infrastructure (FFII) added that the amendments would create a "Soviet internet". "Tomorrow, popular software applications like Skype or even Firefox might be declared illegal in Europe if they are not certified by an administrative authority", warned Benjamin Henrion, FFII representative in Brussels, in a statement.

http://www.pocket-lint.co.uk/news/news.phtml/15960/16984/EU-crackdown-mu...

[Tech Policy Summit] EU Parliament's Telecom Reform Raises "Three-Strikes" Concerns

According to BBC News, members of the European Parliament voted yesterday in favor of advancing new telecom reform legislation known as the Telecoms Package that includes a series of controverisal amendments that digital rights activists say would pave the way for a 'three-strikes' law against online copyright infringers in Europe.

...

Opponents, led by a French group called La Quadrature du Net, warn that the legislation designed to harmonize Europe's telecom laws would instead threaten the openness of the Internet by requiring ISPs to give individuals suspected of downloading unauthorized copyright material two warnings before cutting off their Net access entirely. Another organization, Free Internet Infrastructure (FFII), went a step further, saying that a provision that would give the government the power to determine what type of software can be used online (and what can't) would lead to a "Soviet Internet" in Europe.

The European Parliament will vote on the legislation in September.

http://techpolicysummit.blogs.com/tech_policy_summit/2008/07/eu-parliame...

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