Press review

The press review RSS feed

The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[Spiegel] Orange in Frankreich: Snowden-Enthüllungen zeigen Überwachung

[...] Wie die Tageszeitung "Le Monde" berichtet, haben Frankreichs Geheimdienste offenbar über Jahrzehnte die Bevölkerung abgehört - profitiert haben sie dabei von der Hilfe der Telefongesellschaft France Télécom, die seit 2012 unter dem Namen Orange firmiert. Die Zeitung stellt fest: "Der Zugang ist total, umfassend und außerhalb jeder Kontrolle."

Ruchbar wurde die illegale Lauschpraxis, weil Frankreichs Auslandsgeheimdienst DGSE (Direction générale de la sécurité extérieure) die abgeschöpften Informationen an den britischen GCHQ weiterreichte. [...]

Demnach hätte der Konzern den Spionagebehörden technische Hilfestellung gegeben, seine Abhörkapazitäten zu verbessern, oder Beistand geleistet, um Verschlüsselungstechniken zu umgehen. France Télécom sei damit ein "wichtiger Akteur in Frankreichs Überwachungssystem". [...]

http://www.spiegel.de/netzwelt/netzpolitik/orange-in-frankreich-snowden-...

[NYTimes] N.S.A. Breached Chinese Servers Seen as Security Threat

[...] classified documents show that the National Security Agency was creating its own back doors — directly into Huawei's [the Chinese telecommunications giant] networks.

[...] It obtained information about the workings of the giant routers and complex digital switches that Huawei boasts connect a third of the world’s population, and monitored communications of the company’s top executives.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/23/world/asia/nsa-breached-chinese-server...

[NYTimes] Revelations of N.S.A. Spying Cost U.S. Tech Companies

Microsoft has lost customers, including the government of Brazil. […] IBM is spending more than a billion dollars to build data centers overseas to reassure foreign customers that their information is safe from prying eyes in the United States government. […] And tech companies abroad, from Europe to South America, say they are gaining customers that are shunning United States providers, suspicious because of the revelations by Edward J. Snowden that tied these providers to the National Security Agency’s vast surveillance program. […]

Germany and Brazil, where it was revealed that the N.S.A. spied on government leaders, have been particularly adversarial toward American companies and the government. Lawmakers, including in Germany, are considering legislation that would make it costly or even technically impossible for American tech companies to operate inside their borders.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/22/business/fallout-from-snowden-hurting-...

[TheGuardian] Yahoo, Google and Apple also claim right to read user emails

[...] The broad rights email providers claim for themselves has come to light following Microsoft's admission that it read a journalist's Hotmail account in an attempt to track down the source of an internal leak. But most webmail services claim the right to read users' email if they believe that such access is necessary to protect their property.

[...] Google's terms require the user to "acknowledge and agree that Google may access… your account information and any Content associated with that account… in a good faith belief that such access… is reasonably necessary to… protect against imminent harm to the… property… of Google". Apple "may, without liability to you, access… your Account information and Content… if we have a good faith belief that such access… is reasonably necessary to… protect the… property… of Apple".

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/mar/21/yahoo-google-and-apple...

[TorrentFreak] Nuking a Facebook Page on Bogus Copyright Grounds is Easy

Sending a DMCA complaint to any site is relatively simple, but how easy is it for a giant such as Facebook to be tricked by an imposter into taking a whole page down? According to both victims and perpetrators, it's very easy indeed. [...]

Three years ago it was exceptionally easy to take down a page, but here we are several years later and the process is still open to abuse. So how easy is it to nuke a Facebook page? On condition of anonymity, a person who targeted another’s Facebook page out of revenge explained. [...]

http://torrentfreak.com/nuking-a-facebook-page-on-bogus-copyright-gounds...

[TechDirt] US-EU Relations After Two Important Votes In European Parliament

Glyn Moody's analysis of the major outcomes of two important votes in the European Parliament, one on data protection and the other on NSA surveillance. With regard to data protection, the regulation, would restrict data transfers to non-EU countries, deterrent fines for companies that break the rules, better protection of data on the internet, e.g. introducing the right to have one's personal data erased.

Moody points out however, that "this vote in the European Parliament is not the end of the story [...] the European Council of the European Union [...] must agree."

With regard to the vote on NSA surveillance, the Parliament included "the threat that the European Parliament will withhold its consent to any free trade agreement if data protection is included, or the NSA surveillance is not scaled back". Moreover, it included a "European whistle-blower protection programme" though it rejected a call on support for Edward Snowden directly.

However, "As with the data protection vote, it's not yet clear what effect the approval of the resolution will have. It is not binding, and it would be for the European Commission to implement."

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20140314/09113926578/us-eu-relations-af...

[TechDirt] EU Re-Think Following Discovery Of Major Flaw In CETA Shows The Benefits Of Transparency

The Canada-European Union trade agreement (CETA) finds itself in a strange situation. Although Canada and the EU announced that "a political agreement" on the key elements had been reached, there has still been no formal release of the text. Fortunately, we have had several leaks of CETA documents, handily gathered on a new site devoted to them (and to those of the TAFTA/TTIP talks). One of the most recent leaks is of the chapter dealing with corporate sovereignty. It's dated February 14, and shows a large number of alternative versions, which indicates that despite the "political agreement", CETA is far from done. [...]

It's not clear whether the European Commission woke up to this huge loophole as a result of the International Institute for Sustainable Development analysis, although this seems likely given the timing. But the key point is that the incident raises the larger question:

"What other mistakes have the Commission and Canadian government made in CETA that compromise the ability of governments to make environmental, public health and consumer protection policies without worrying they will be sued in private arbitration, behind closed doors?" asks Stuart Trew, trade campaigner with the Council of Canadians. [...]

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20140317/10372026597/eu-re-think-follo...

[Techdirt] EU Re-Think Following Discovery Of Major Flaw In CETA Shows The Benefits Of Transparency

The Canada-European Union trade agreement (CETA) finds itself in a strange situation. Although Canada and the EU announced that "a political agreement" on the key elements had been reached, there has still been no formal release of the text. Fortunately, we have had several leaks of CETA documents, handily gathered on a new site devoted to them (and to those of the TAFTA/TTIP talks). One of the most recent leaks is of the chapter dealing with corporate sovereignty. It's dated February 14, and shows a large number of alternative versions, which indicates that despite the "political agreement", CETA is far from done. [...]

We don't know, because we don't have a full copy of the latest CETA draft. If we did, then independent experts could go through it and warn of other flawed passages, thus avoiding serious problems in years to come when it is too late to change anything.

This, then, is another key reason why negotiating texts must be made available as they are drafted, not after they have been signed: Linus' Law, that "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow," applies to international agreements as well as to software code. But the big difference is that for programming, it's a question of how well code runs; with things like CETA, TTIP and TPP, what's at stake is the potentially huge economic and social damage that can be caused by loopholes and carelessly-worded clauses in these far-reaching international agreements.

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20140317/10372026597/eu-re-think-follow...

[ComputerWorld][pt] Operadores perdem no roaming e ganham na neutralidade

O comité da indústria do Parlamento Europeu aprovou um pacote legislativo do qual resultará o fim das taxas de roaming na União Europeia. Mas o conjunto de leis aprovado abre caminho também para o lançamento de “serviços especializados”. [...]

Alguns grupos acreditam que as regras mais flexíveis sobre a neutralidade da rede serão uma contrapartida para as empresas de telecomunicações, face à perda das receitas de roaming. “A votação de hoje é um sinal do enorme do poder de ‘lobby’ dos grandes operadores de telecomunicações no processo legislativo europeu. As grandes lacunas do regulamento terão de ser corrigidas quando o Parlamento Europeu fizer a sua votação final daqui a poucas semanas”, disse Miriam Artino, jurídico e analista político da organização La Quadrature du Net.

http://www.computerworld.com.pt/2014/03/19/operadores-perdem-no-roaming-...

[TechCrunch] Brazil’s ‘Constitution Of The Internet’ Puts Net Neutrality In The Spotlight

Brazil’s Congress is days away from voting on Marco Civil, the country’s first major Internet legislation, and the big issue at stake is net neutrality.

The bill, known as the “Constitution of the Internet,” has three major themes: net neutrality, freedom of expression, and Internet security. It had been rolling around Congress for two years until Edward Snowden’s revelations of the NSA spying on Brazilians — including the president — prompted President Dilma Rousseff to prioritize the bill, suspending voting on all other legislation.

[...] “Without neutrality, the Internet looks more like cable TV, where providers can offer different service packages,” said Ronaldo Lemos, a law professor, partner with PNM Advogados, director of the Institute for Technology & Society in Rio de Janeiro, and board member at Mozilla. “Basic service would include email and the social networks. ‘Premium’ would let you watch videos and listen to music. ‘Super Premium’ would let you download. Today that sounds like an aberration, but without net neutrality, it’s a possibility.”

[...] Mass mobilization in support of net neutrality has been the result of efforts by the same players who rose to prominence during Brazil’s coming-of-age protests that started last June. They are precisely the kinds of bare-bones budget, activist websites that could suffer discriminated access if net neutrality does not pass.

http://techcrunch.com/2014/03/19/brazils-constitution-of-the-internet-pu...

Syndicate content
Support La Quadrature du Net!