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The press review catalogues press articles related to la Quadrature's issues, compiled by its volunteers.
See also our French press review.

[Thelocal] Mobile operators seek to 'block' Skype in Sweden

Swedish telecom operators want to implement technologies that will block mobile phone users in Sweden from making free calls using services like Skype and Viber. [...]

According to the European Commission, maintaining "net neutrality" – whereby all internet traffic is treated equally – is important and companies shouldn't be able to control how customers use the network. [...]

"These preliminary findings prove that EU operators impose unjustifiable restrictions to Internet access," said Jérémie Zimmermann, spokesperson of France-based citizen advocacy group La Quadrature du Net. [...]

http://www.thelocal.se/39938/20120328/#.UQvyqx1ZTsw

[EuObserver] MEPs to vote on Acta before summer

MEPs in the parliament's trade committee Tuesday (27 March) rejected a proposal to refer Acta to the European Court of Justice, meaning the controversial anti-counterfeit treaty is set to be voted on before summer.

Deputies rejected the court proposal by a large majority of 21 to five. Immediately after the vote the centre-left Socialist group and the Greens indicated their intention to reject the treaty. [...]

Meanwhile, Green MEP Amelia Andersdotter commented that the treaty "should never have been concluded in the first place" adding that Acta would "lead to a heavy-handed and repressive enforcement of copyright with no regard to the basic rights of citizens." [...]

Internet campaign group La Quadrature Du Net had suggested that the Parliament referring the deal to the Court would have delayed a final decision for over a year. [...]

Martin is expected to present his opinion on whether the trade committee should accept or reject Acta at the end of April. The trade committee is itself expected to vote on the matter at the end of the following month while a final plenary vote is likely to occur in June.

http://euobserver.com/871/115725

[TheRegister] European Parliament votes against ACTA legal review

The European Parliament (EP) has voted overwhelmingly not to refer the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) for judicial review, but instead to strike while the iron is hot and vote on the treaty this June. [...]

"The Commission and the rapporteur's tricks have been avoided," said Jérémie Zimmermann, spokesperson for internet rights group La Quadrature du Net, in a statement, "and the Parliament can now proceed with its works on ACTA. MEPs will have to shed the light on the democratic and political issues raised by ACTA, such as the extra-judicial measures aimed at stepping up the repression of online sharing." [...]

Pro- and anti-ACTA forces now have a clear deadline to work towards, and will be marshaling their forces to mobilize support. So far over two million people have signed a petition against ACTA, and the EP vote will determine whether Germany, Poland, and other EU states will ratify the agreement.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/03/27/european_parliament_votes_acta_r...

[V3.Co.Uk] EU Parliament votes against delaying ACTA decison

In a 21 to five vote, the European Parliament's international trade committee ruled not to stall the final decision on the controversial anti-couterfeiting proposal. The decision has since been welcomed by activist groups.

"[Today's vote] demonstrates a growing understanding of ACTA's issues by a wide range of MEPs, and an ability to avoid the procedural traps set up by the EU Commission and some pro-ACTA MEPs," said Philippe Aigrain, co-founder of citizens group La Quadrature du Net.

"It is a promising step, but only the final rejection of ACTA will settle the issue."

Jérémie Zimmermann, also of La Quadrature du Net, added, "The Commission and the rapporteur's tricks have been avoided, and the Parliament can now proceed with its works on ACTA. MEPs will have to shed light on the democratic and political issues raised by ACTA, such as the extra-judicial measures aimed at stepping up the repression of online sharing." [...]

http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2163986/eu-parliament-votes-delaying-acta...

[ComputerActive] European Parliament to rule on anti-counterfeiting trade deal

Following a majority vote against sending ACTA for legal scrutiny, the European Parliament's decision was welcomed by La Quadrature du Net.

The European Parliament has decided not to send the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) for legal scrutiny in the European Court of Justice. [...]

This decision will please online advocacy group La Quadrature du Net which has been actively campaigning against the secretive agreement.

Jérémie Zimmermann for the group had said: "If the EU Parliament gives in to these technocratic tricks, it will give up on protecting EU citizens. Enough is known about ACTA to justify working towards its rejection without having to wait for the opinion of the ECJ. "
"Delaying the debate rather than have the courage to engage with the political issues raised by ACTA would completely undermine the democratic standing of the Parliament."[...]

http://www.computeractive.co.uk/ca/news/2164025/european-parliament-rule...

[TheInquerer] European Parliament votes against submitting ACTA for court review

IN A VOTE TODAY the European Parliament decided not to submit the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) treaty to the European Court of Justice (ECJ) for review. Instead it will rule on ACTA itself.

[...] This is good news, since la Quadrature Du Net has suggested that the ECJ's involvement would have delayed ACTA consideration for 18 months. The advocacy group said earlier that the involvement of the ECJ was a delaying tactic that the debate over ACTA could do without [...]

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2163975/european-parliament-vot...

[ItWorld] EU Parliament to vote on ACTA without waiting for a court decision

Campaigners against ACTA (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) are hailing as a success the decision by the European Parliament's trade committee not to refer the deal to the European Court of Justice (ECJ).

The committee on Tuesday rejected a plan to send the proposed accord to the E.U.'s highest court by 21 votes to five. This means that the proposed deal could be put before the whole Parliament as soon as June, avoiding a possible delay of about 18 months for a court decision.

Digital rights groups opposed to ACTA, such as La Quadrature du Net, said that " the plan to send the deal to the ECJ had been nothing more than a stalling tactic. " [...]

http://www.itworld.com/government/262642/eu-parliament-vote-acta-without...

[TechDirt] ICANN Confirms That It's Going To Make It Easier For Governments To Seize Domains Around The Globe

This just gets worse and worse. After pointing out that ICANN was missing a big (and important) opportunity by not speaking out against governments seizing domain names, we were disappointed to see ICANN release a white paper that was more of a how-to manual for governments on seizing domains.ow, Paul Keating points us to the depressing news that ICANN is now publicly saying that it will work more closely with governments around the world to help them seize and censor domains. [...]

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120320/17474318177/icann-confirms-tha...

[SlashDot] Senator Wyden Demands ACTA Goes Before Congress

"As recently covered here, EU countries are starting to drop ACTA support. Now, long-time opponent of the secretly negotiated Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, Sen. Ron Wyden introduced an amendment to a Senate 'jobs bill' that would force ACTA to come before Congress for approval. [...]

http://politics.slashdot.org/story/12/03/21/1232216/senator-wyden-demand...

[TechDirt] German Gov't Uses Anger Over Lack Of ACTA Transparency To Justify Further Lack Of Transparency

Even though the ACTA text is now finalized, getting details from national governments about what exactly happened during the negotiations is proving extremely difficult, with information still trickling out slowly.

For example, […] the European Commission tried to counter accusations that the negotiations were lacking in transparency by pointing out that the German government had a representative present during all the sessions (that's transparency?). This was news to people, since the German government had somehow omitted to mention this fact. [...]

As well as details of who took part, there is one other category of information whose release is vital: the preparatory documents used during the negotiations. [...]

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120319/10545718159/german-govt-we-can...

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