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Press review about Net Neutrality

[NewYorker] Goodbye, Net Neutrality; Hello, Net Discrimination : The New Yorker

A blog post by Tim Wu, inventor of the term "network neutrality", comments on the implications on the FCC, the Federal Communications Commission, who have "proposed a new rule that [...] permits and encourages [...] broadband carriers acting as gatekeepers and charging Web sites a payola payment to reach customers through a “fast lane.”[...]"

[NYTimes] F.C.C., in a Shift, Backs Fast Lanes for Web Traffic

The Federal Communications Commission said on Wednesday that it would propose new rules that allow companies like Disney, Google or Netflix to pay Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon for special, faster lanes to send video and other content to their customers.

[TechDirt] Protests Mount Against Mexico's Proposed Telecommunications Law, Which Would Bring In Censorship, Allow Real-time Surveillance And Kill Net Neutrality

[...] On the face of it then, a new Mexican telecoms law that aims to loosen the grip of those dominant companies should be a good thing. But increasingly people are worried that its bad elements may outweigh the good [...].

That's a pretty toxic mix -- censorship, real-time surveillance and no net neutrality. The good news is that Mexicans are starting to mobilize against the proposed measures:

[NYTimes] F.C.C., in a Shift, Backs Fast Lanes for Web Traffic

The principle that all Internet content should be treated equally as it flows through cables and pipes to consumers looks all but dead.

The Federal Communications Commission said on Wednesday that it would propose new rules that allow companies like Disney, Google or Netflix to pay Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon for special, faster lanes to send video and other content to their customers.

[BoingBoing] Message to NETmundial: protect fundamental Internet freedoms

Jeremie [Zimmermann] from France's La Quadrature du Net sez, "The farcical illusion of 'multistakeholder' discussions around 'Internet governance' must be denounced! For the last 15 years those sterile discussions led nowhere, with no concrete action ever emerging. In the meantime, technology as a whole has been turned into a terrifying machine for surveillance, control and oppression.

[Techdirt] Yes, Net Neutrality Is A Solution To An Existing Problem

While AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon have argued -- with incredible message discipline -- that network neutrality is "a solution in search of a problem," that's simply not true.

There are many concrete examples of network neutrality violations around the world. These network neutrality violations include ISPs blocking websites and applications, ISPs discriminating in favor of some applications and against others, and ISPs charging arbitrary tolls on technology companies. [...]

[ArsTechnica] After Netflix pays Comcast, speeds improve 65%

Netflix's decision to pay Comcast for a direct connection to the Comcast network has resulted in significantly better video streaming performance for customers of the nation's largest broadband provider.

Netflix has bemoaned the payment, asking the government to prevent Comcast from demanding such interconnection "tolls."

[...] Comcast's increased speed allowed it to pass Time Warner Cable, Verizon, CenturyLink, AT&T U-verse, and others in Netflix's rankings. Comcast remains slower than Cablevision, Cox, Suddenlink, Charter, and Google Fiber.

[LaJornada] "Ataque directo a la libertad de expresión", la iniciativa de Peña en telecomunicaciones

Cualquier intento por restringir o limitar el acceso a Internet debe entenderse como un ataque directo a la libertad de expresión, advirtió Jérémie Zimmermann, tras señalar que la iniciativa de regulación secundaria a la Ley de Telecomunicaciones, enviada por el gobierno de Enrique Peña Nieto al Congreso, es absolutamente contraria a la apertura que se buscaba con la reforma en el sector, pues tiende a monopolizar este servicio.

[ArsTechnica] One big reason we lack Internet competition: Starting an ISP is really hard

Interesting article describing some of the reasons why it's hard to start an ISP (in the USA), including tactics that bigger companies use to make it harder. Describes business models which touches on the question of Net Neutrality.

http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/04/one-big-reason-we-lack-internet-...

[Gigaom] European Parliament passes strong net neutrality law, along with major roaming reforms

It was a closely-fought contest, but Europe’s crucial telecoms package has passed through its first European Parliament vote, as have amendments that remove loopholes that would have clashed with the open internet. [...]

[Repubblica] Neutralità della Rete, la Ue inizia dal taglio dei roaming. Verso il mercato unico

Il Parlamento europeo punta su una definizione chiara di net neutrality, secondo cui gli operatori sono obbligati a trattare allo stesso modo tutto il traffico. Passando all'abbattimento di costi per facilitare comunicazioni e affari […]

Per capire la portata della novità, bisogna sapere che il testo della Commissione era stato molto contestato nei mesi scorsi dalle associazioni dei consumatori e dagli attivisti dei diritti di internet (come l'associazione Quadrature du Net) […]

[BBC News] Net neutrality law adopted by European Parliament

The European Parliament has voted to restrict internet service providers' (ISPs) ability to charge data-hungry services for faster network access. […]

French digital rights campaign group La Quadrature du Net described the vote as being hugely important.

"The EU Parliament made clear that the internet commons should be free of corporate capture, and remain a space where freedom of communication and innovation can thrive," it said.

The BBC also signalled the law could also prove beneficial.

[Wired UK] Victory for net neutrality in European Parliament

The European Parliament has voted to pass a package of telecoms law reform with some critical amendments that will safeguard net neutrality.

[NYTimes] E.U. Lawmakers Approve Tough ‘Net Neutrality’ Rules

[...] European lawmakers approved new rules on Thursday aimed at guaranteeing equal access to the Internet and cutting cellphone charges across the 28-member European Union.

The proposals, which had been subject to intense lobbying by industry groups and consumer advocates, mirror similar efforts in the United States to allow access by all companies and individuals to the Internet’s pipelines for services like streaming music, on-demand television and cloud computing. [...]