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Press review about Net Neutrality

[Wired] Free Mobile Data Plans Are Going to Crush the Startup Economy

The deal sounds great: Stream unlimited music without any data charges. The offer from T-Mobile includes popular services such as Spotify, iTunes, and Pandora. These apps will no longer count against your data plan, the company announced recently, no matter how much you stream across its 4G LTE network. [...]

[WashingtonPost] Verizon's slowing down data for some of its heaviest users. And the FCC is calling them out on it.

The Federal Communications Commission has sent a strongly worded letter to Verizon warning that changes in the way it handles mobile Internet traffic may violate federal regulations. More broadly, the letter by FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is the latest sign that the commission is considering applying its new net neutrality rules to wireless carriers. [...]

[Time] Net Neutrality: T-Mobile's Unlimited Music Streaming Is the Worst

"Music freedom" looks like a benefit for subscribers, and that's the most dangerous part. [...]

Instead of treating all music services equally, T-Mobile has decided that the most popular streaming music services should get better treatment. If you have a limited data plan on T-Mobile, you won’t come any closer to your monthly cap when using Spotify, Pandora, Rhapsody, iTunes Radio, iHeartRadio, Slacker Radio and Samsung Milk Music. [...]

[EDRi] Neelie Kroes’ campaign to kill net neutrality

[…] Rather than sitting back and waiting for the Council to carry out its work, Vice President of the Commission Neelie Kroes has been working hard to dissuade Council members from supporting net neutrality, something she was not able to stop in the European Parliament despite her (sometimes highly dubious) tactics. […]

[Reuters] Factbox: What is net neutrality? U.S. debates once again

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is collecting public comments until Sept. 10 on new "net neutrality" or "open Internet rules" that may let service providers charge content companies for faster and more reliable delivery of their traffic to users.

[MotherJones] Verizon Says It Wants to Kill Net Neutrality to Help Blind, Deaf, and Disabled People

Lobbyists are telling Congress that the administration's plan to create internet fast lanes and slow lanes is important for Americans with disabilities. [...]

[TheGuardian] The government ruled for net neutrality. Too bad it wasn't your government

In America and Europe, the internet is going mobile out of convenience. In the developing world, mobile is the internet. Here's what happens when companies take advantage of that.[...]

[EurActiv] Italian Presidency vows telecoms reform by end of 2014

Italy’s incoming presidency of the EU will focus on adopting the entire telecoms reform by the end of the year and will avoid splitting the package to put aside the most controversial issues, a member of the Italian government told EurActiv. [...]

He insisted that the package has been devised as “unitary” and therefore needs to stay as it is, ruling out that some controversial elements of the reform may be taken away, such as the net neutrality. [...]

[BoingBoing] It's not Net Neutrality that's at stake, it's Cable Company Fuckery

John Oliver was incandescent on the subject of Net Neutrality, Time Warner and Comcast on Saturday, and he has a new, less-boring term for Net Neutrality: "Cable Company Fuckery." This is not only brilliant, it's hilarious. John Oliver is a perfect blend of Jon Stewart and Charlie Brooker. A reminder: you can reach out and touch the FCC on the subject of Cable Company Fuckery, and EFF can explain how to do it. [...]

[Dailydot] These companies spend the most money to kill net neutrality

With the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) decision to move forward with a controversial proposal that threatens net neutrality and the open Internet, lobbying activity looks like it has reached a fevered pitch. But for the companies involved—especially the telecom companies that are eager to be allowed to charge more for a “fast lane” of Internet service—lobbying has been at a fevered pitch for almost a decade.

[GigaOm] Forget fast lanes. The real threat for net-neutrality is zero-rated content

When telcos zero-rate data used by their apps and their partners’ apps, they are engaging in price discrimination and threatening net neutrality. The practice should be banned in U.S. and Europe. […]

[Dailydot] Why the U.K. might kill the EU's net neutrality law

While the debate over net neutrality continues to rage in the United States, the British government is planning to block European Union legislation on the matter.

It’s a surprising turn of events. Just last month, the European Parliament voted to place the principles of net neutrality into law. However, before it becomes law throughout Europe, each member country must also pass the legislation. On Thursday, the British government indicated it may veto it instead.

[TorrentFreak] Music Industry Demands Pirate Bay Blockade in France

The major record labels continue their efforts to drive The Pirate Bay underground with France being the next in line. A local music industry group has informed several ISPs that it has requested a court blocking injunction against the popular torrent site. In addition, more than a hundred Pirate Bay proxies are also being targeted. […]

[EurActiv] Italian presidency to support Parliament-backed telecoms reform

The incoming Italian presidency of the European Union is ready to support the European Parliament-backed overhaul of EU telecoms rules, despite widespread criticism of the plan from governments and leading operators. […]

Italy, whose presidency of the EU will start in July and will run until the end of the year, seems ready to go against the tide of other member states.

A diplomatic source confirmed that the objective of the incoming presidency is to defend the parliament's text and have it approved by the council. […]