Press review about Net Neutrality

[LeMondeDiplomatique] What's (still) wrong with ACTA

Negotiations on ACTA were formerly announced on October 23, 2007. The ACTA announcement came less than three weeks after the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) adopted the “Development Agenda,” and was part of a broader strategy by right holders to move norm setting and technical assistance into more secretive, closed and captured institutions.[...]

[East Media Group] ACTA not contemplated by or sent to government for adoption

The Ministry of Education and Science, responding to incorrect information in the media about Serbia’s accession to the ACTA agreement, stated that this agreement has not been contemplated by the relevant ministry, nor sent to the government for adoption. [...]

http://www.emg.rs/en/news/serbia/175302.html

[Deutsche Welle] Germany considers two strike online piracy law

A study proposing a two strikes model against Internet piracy in Germany is being welcomed by the Ministry of Economics. The study arrives as others in Europe hesitate to ratify the controversial ACTA treaty. [...]
The German study looked very closely at the French model of Hadopi, the three strikes law that has been in effect there since late 2010.[...]

[TheGuardian] Acta approval stalled by European commission

Approval of the controversial international anti-counterfeiting treaty Acta has been stalled by the European commission, which is to ask Europe's highest court whether implementing it would violate any fundamental EU rights.

[Washingtonpost] EU, facing opposition, suspends ratification of copyright treaty, refers to Court of Justice

The European Commission, facing opposition in city streets, on the Internet and in the halls of parliament, has suspended efforts to ratify a new international anti-counterfeiting agreement, and instead will refer it to Europe’s highest court to see whether it violates any fundamental EU rights. [...]

[TheTandD] EU suspends copyright treaty ratification

The European Commission, facing opposition in city streets, on the Internet and in the halls of parliament, has suspended efforts to ratify a new international anti-counterfeiting agreement, and instead will refer it to Europe's highest court to see whether it violates any fundamental EU rights.[...]

"ACTA will not censor websites or shut them down; ACTA will not hinder freedom of the internet or freedom of speech," De Gucht said.

[Reuters] KT reviewing network fees on Youtube, Internet TVs

South Korea's top Internet provider, KT Corp plans to charge data-heavy content providers such as Google's Youtube and Internet-enabled TV service operators to subsidize costly network upgrades, a KT executive said on Thursday. [...]

"We want to set a rule that we can equally apply to every platform operator that offers data-heavy content as those services threaten to black out our network. They should pay for using our network," Kim Taehwan, vice president of KT's smart network policy task force, told Reuters in an interview. [...]

[3news.co.nz] Polish protesters fight for internet freedoms

Eastern Europe's tradition of political revolt has met the digital age. This time it's not communists or food shortages fuelling fury, but an international copyright treaty that opponents say threatens freedom on the internet. [...]

« Most of the people who have gone to the streets are young and don't remember communism themselves, but Polish society as an entity remembers, » said Jaroslaw Lipszyc, the president of the Modern Poland Foundation, an organization devoted to education and developing an information society.

[Timesofmalta] The deactivation of Acta

Acta is an international agreement created by the United States and Japan – and in some cases signed without public consultation – but excluding some European countries like Germany, Latvia, Poland and the Czech Republic and negotiated in secret with main international companies.[...]

[Fsrn] Headlines for Friday, February 17, 2012 : ACTA dealt blow by European court

[...]

Europe's highest court has ruled that online services such as Facebook and YouTube cannot be forced to police their customers' use of music, movies or other copyrighted material. Digital activists say it's another blow to the anti-piracy initiative known as ACTA From France, FSRN's Liam Moriarty has more.

[BusinessWeek] AT&T Must Let Beastie Boy Vote on Net Neutrality, SEC Says

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has told AT&T Inc. and other telecommunications companies they must include a resolution supporting wireless net-neutrality in annual shareholder votes. [...]

The shareholder resolution would recommend each company “publicly commit to operate its wireless broadband network consistent with network neutrality principles,” the letter said. The companies should not discriminate based on the “source, ownership or destination” of data sent over their wireless infrastructure. [...]

[Guardian] Acta loses more support in Europe

Support for Acta in Europe is waning as both Bulgaria and the Netherlands refuse to ratify the international anti-piracy agreement.

Bulgaria will not ratify the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement over fears it will curb freedom to download movies and music for free and encourage internet surveillance, economy minister Traicho Traikov said on Tuesday.

[HindustanTimes] Protests erupt against web piracy treaty

Tens of thousands of protesters took part in rallies across Europe on Saturday against an international anti-piracy agreement they fear will curb their freedom to download movies and music for free and encourage Internet surveillance. More than 25,000 demonstrators braved freezing temperatures in German cities to march against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) [...]

[TorrentFreak] US Threatened To Blacklist Spain For Not Implementing Site Blocking Law

In a leaked letter sent to Spain’s outgoing President, the US ambassador to the country warned that as punishment for not passing a SOPA-style file-sharing site blocking law, Spain risked being put on a United States trade blacklist . Inclusion would have left Spain open to a range of “retaliatory options” but already the US was working with the incoming government to reach its goals.

[...] Zapatero’s government left office without passing the law, but the incoming Partido Popular (People’s Party) were quickly pressured by the US to take the necessary action.

[TechRadar] Bristol's community-built wireless network

[...] much of the equipment is homemade, it encourages learning and hacking, and it embodies the spirit of Freedom 2 of the Free Software definition - the freedom to share so you can help your neighbour.

Their first piece of equipment was a series of 'cantennas'. These ingenious devices, otherwise known as 'tin can waveguide antennas', can significantly extend the range of a Wi-Fi connection for virtually no cost.

This all took place in Bristol Wireless's first few years and now the project is rapidly approaching its 10th birthday, so what's happened in between?