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Press review about Net Neutrality

[ArsTechnica] As ISPs throttle, Europe hopes competition will "discipline operators"

Want to make a Skype call through your smartphone in Europe? At least one-fifth of mobile broadband users on the continent face technical or contractual restrictions on their use of VoIP products, while more than a third of European mobile users also have restrictions on their P2P usage.[...]

[EuObserver] Brussles to tackle online blocking and throttling

Digital agenda commissioner Neelie Kroes is to draft legislation on 'net neutrality' following data that between 20 and 50 percent of European Internet providers use software to block online access. [...]

[CIO] European Commission favors consumer choice over net neutrality legislation

Neelie Kroes wants to give consumers the opportunity to choose neutral Internet access services, but won't ban limited access services. [...]

At least 20 percent of E.U. mobile broadband users, and potentially up to half of them, have contracts that allow their providers to restrict access to P2P file sharing and to VOIP services such as Skype, Kroes said. [...]

[Guardian] Internet freedom 'under threat from hasty legislation in UK and US'

Head of global media observation group says many countries are trying to restrict internet freedom in name of security.

Governments across the world – including those in the US and UK – are posing a threat to internet freedom through "hasty" legislation passed due to security fears, the head of an international media watchdog has warned. [...]

[Reuters] EU regulator warns against Internet restrictions

The European commissioner responsible for regulating the Internet warned Web service providers on Thursday against tampering with customers' Internet access based on how much they pay or which services they use.

In an effort to preserve what they call "net neutrality", European Union governments have considered enforcing laws preventing providers from offering differentiated tiers of access, but so far only the Netherlands has succeeded. [...]

[Guardian] Internet censorship: how does each country compare?

Censorship of internet content can take many forms and ranges from governments blocking the dissemination of political opinion to blacklisting pornographic and pirate websites. [...]

According to the ONI data, Iran was the worst ranked, with "pervasive" filtering in the political, social and internet tools categories and "substantial" for conflict/security filtering. Tested in 2011, Iran's filtering was rated as being "highly" consistent and had "medium" transparency. [...]

[TechDirt] ACTA Closer To Death: Remaining EU Supporters Contemplate Rejecting It

Last week we saw the Socialists and Democrats, the second-largest bloc in the European Parliament, turn against ACTA. Combined with the stated position of the Green party there, that means ACTA is closer to being thrown out when the vote for ratification takes place in Brussels this summer.

The deciding factor is how politicians in the centre-right coalition of Liberals and Conservatives will vote, and there are now signs that they too are contemplating rejection [...]

[IBTimes] Iran To Shut Down Internet Permanently; 'Clean' National Intranet In Pipeline

Millions of Internet users in Iran will be permanently denied access to the World Wide Web and cut off from popular social networking sites and email services, as the government has announced its plans to establish a national Intranet within five months. [...]

[Guardian] UK 'exporting surveillance technology to repressive nations'

Fears that software similar to that which government wants to use in Britain is being sold to monitor dissidents abroad. [...]

It is the responsibility of manufacturers to ensure their technology is not used to perpetrate human rights abuses. But there are now calls for them to be subject to stringent export controls requiring a licence to sell abroad.

[TechDirt] Where TPP Goes Beyond ACTA -- And How It Shows Us The Future Of IP Enforcement

ACTA and TPP have much in common. That's no coincidence, since they are both born of a common desire to move away from multilateral forums like WIPO that are relatively open to scrutiny, to invitation-only groups negotiating behind closed doors. That lack of transparency has allowed all kinds of extreme measures to be proposed without any countervailing arguments being heard about why they are neither fair nor sensible. [...]

[TheSocietyPages] CISPA- the new SOPA

House representative Mike Rogers (R-MI) introduced a bill back in November called the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (H.R. 3523) or CISPA. It has since been referred to and reported by the appropriate committees. Since then, according to Representative Rogers’ own web site, over 100 members of congress have already announced their support for the bill [...]

[LATimes] Britain's plan to expand state surveillance causes furor

The plan would allow secret trials and tracking of calls and online activities for national security reasons. Critics see an attack on freedom and privacy. [...]

Some of the strongest criticism has come from his ruling coalition, including from his No. 2. Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg heads the Liberal Democrats, the junior partner in government and a party that traditionally has been a strong supporter of civil liberties. [...]

[EurActiv] Commission sides with business on ACTA

The European Commission took a stance yesterday (4 April) in favour of a quick adoption of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), against the will of the European Parliament, which plans to reject it in a plenary vote by the summer. [...]

The statement comes in response to noises from the Socialist and Green groups in the European Parliament, which vowed to "bury" ACTA by the summer, before the Court would have a chance to issue a verdict. [...]

[Europa] Update on ACTA's referral to the European Court of Justice

Today, the European Commission has taken the next step in the important process of referring the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) to the European Court of Justice (ECJ). By agreeing on the legal submission to be put before the ECJ, the Commission aims to respond to the wide-ranging concerns voiced by people across Europe on what ACTA is about and whether it harms fundamental rights in any way. [...]