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[Computerworlduk] Groups to monitor EU telcos restricting online access

Digital civil liberties groups in Europe have launched an online platform asking citizens to "name and shame" telecommunications companies that impose internet access restrictions.

[Broadbandwatcher.Co.Uk] European activists join forces to keep net neutrality in place

Net neutrality should be here to stay, that’s why it’s a good idea to keep an eye on any violations and report those, thought two civil society groups.

In more detail, La Quadrature du Net (based in France) and Bits of Freedom (in Holland) have put together a website which would serve as a log for absolutely anyone who noticed a violation of the principal of net neutrality and wanted to report it. […]

http://www.broadbandwatcher.co.uk/european-activists-join-forces-to-keep...

[Cio.Au] Groups to monitor EU telcos restricting online access

Digital civil liberties groups in Europe have launched an online platform asking citizens to "name and shame" telecommunications companies that impose Internet access restrictions.

[Computerworld.Pt] Organizações querem monitorizar restrições de operadores

Respect My Net é a nova plataforma online lançada por várias organizações para controlar as restrições de operadores aos seus serviços de Internet, na Europa. Os grupos pedem aos cidadãos para “nomear e envergonhar” as empresas de telecomunicações cuja política impõe restrições de acesso à Internet. […]

[Netzpolitik.Org] Europäische Meldestelle für Netzneutralität: RespectMyNet.eu

In dieser Woche haben die beiden Bürgerrechtsorganisationen Bits of Freedom und Quadrature du Net zusammen ein Projekt gestartet, um Verletzungen des Prinzips der Netzneutralität europaweit aufzulisten. Die Plattform RespectMyNet.eu ermöglicht es allen Nutzern, als Wächter des Internets Verstöße gegen die Netzneutralität zu melden. […]

http://netzpolitik.org/2011/europaische-meldestelle-fur-netzneutralitat-...

[Pcworld] Groups to Monitor EU Telcos Restricting Online Access

Digital civil liberties groups in Europe have launched an online platform asking citizens to "name and shame" telecommunications companies that impose Internet access restrictions.

The aim is to gather information about Internet providers that are "violating ... online freedom" according to advocacy group La Quadrature du Net. Large telecom providers want to "control what you do online," […]

[Guardian.Co.Uk] Google faces pressure to block filesharing sites

Culture secretary to urge internet companies to downgrade rogue websites in search listings

Google faces pressure to block alleged filesharing websites such as The Pirate Bay.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/sep/13/google-block-filesharin...

[Ip-watch.Org] "Washington Declaration" Demands Return Of Public Interest In IP Rights

A new multi-stakeholder declaration demanding that the public interest be returned to intellectual property rights was issued this week and is open for signatures by anyone, already collecting hundreds of supporters. The declaration contains numerous principles and actions, such as restraint in enforcement, open access, and development priorities, that the drafters hope will help change the course of IP policymaking.

[eWeekEurope] Nominet Considers Criminal Domain Takedown Rules

Nominet, the registrar that handles .uk domains, is moving ahead with proposed rules (PDF) that could allow law enforcement agencies to request a domain be shut down without a court order.

[AlJazeera] Democracies learn from Mubarak's example

For the past eight months, the world has watched, captivated, as from one country to the next, youth have manipulated the digital tools that have become part and parcel of their everyday lives to serve their activism. The world too has witnessed as, in each country, state actors have made various attempts to quash the use of such tools.

[Guardian.co.uk] Tory MP Louise Mensch backs social network blackouts during civil unrest

Louise Mensch, the Conservative MP and one of parliament's more active Twitter users, has backed David Cameron's call for social networking services to be shut down temporarily during civil disorder.

On her Twitter feed, she added: "Northamptonshire police advise me that much of their time and resources were wasted answering false alarms due to soc media rumours. At the time, tweeted people should think hard before putting the phrase 'rumours of' into a tweet. Nonsense rumours about W'boro [Wellingborough] = 999 calls."

[BBCNews] Government drops website blocking

Plans to block websites that host copyright infringing material are to be dumped by the government.

Mr Cable also announced a raft of measures intended to update the UK's copyright laws.

The changes are based on the Hargreaves Review which was set up to examine current legislation's fitness for purpose in the digital age.

Updated laws on copyright could have a profound effect on the popular culture that can be created, albeit one that was hard to measure, she added.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14372698

[TorrentFreak] ISPs, Academics and Citizens Oppose EU Anti-Piracy Legislation

Today the European Commission published the responses to a public consultation on Europe’s anti-piracy directive IPRED. As expected, there is a huge divide between the copyright holders on the one hand, and Internet providers, academics and citizens on the other. The latter fiercely oppose the draconian measures that IPRED introduces, claiming it threatens basic human rights while stifling innovation.

[NYTimes] Free Speech and the Internet

As the United Nations has said, access to the Internet is a human right. A report by the U.N.’s special rapporteur presented last month to the Human Rights Council in Geneva warns that this right is being threatened by governments around the world — democracies included.

[Arstechnica] Civilizing the 'Net: ISPs told to play copyright cop

A major Internet conference ended today in Paris with the publication of an official "Communiqué on Principles for Internet Policy-Making" (PDF). A key piece of these principles involves deputizing Internet providers to become Internet cops—cops that would act on the basis of "voluntary agreements" with content owners and other groups, not on national laws.