Online Services Directive

Civil Society Calls on the ECHR's Grand Chamber to Overturn Delfi v. Estonia Ruling

Paris, 15 January 2014 — Last October, the European Court of Human Rights issued a ruling against an Estonian news portal (“Delfi”), making the platform liable for defamatory comments posted by third users. This ruling threatens to encourage privatised censorship and to severely undermine public debate online. From a legal perspective, as NGO Article 19 wrote at the time, “this judgment displays a profound failure to understand the EU legal framework regulating intermediary liability. In addition, it conveniently ignores relevant international standards in the area of freedom of expression on the Internet”. Many organizations and companies all across Europe have sent the following letter to the ECHR's president to support Delfi's appeal to the Court's “Grand Chamber”, which still has the power to overturn this dangerous ruling.

Will French Parliamentarians Consent to a Democratorship?

Numerous reactions are now being voiced against the inclusion in the 2014-2019 French Defense Bill of article 13 whose provisions enable a pervasive surveillance of online data and communications. Gilles Babinet, appointed in 2012 as French Digital Champion to Nellie Kroes, Vice-President of the European Commission responsible for the Digital Agenda for Europe, was quoted [fr] in the French newspaper Les Echos, “This law is the most serious attack on democracy since the special tribunals during the Algerian War” (our translation).

ACTA Mobilization, And Beyond

Paris, April 19th, 2012 - In the next few weeks, the EU Parliament will continue to work on ACTA, the anti-counterfeiting trade agreement, ahead of its final vote around the summer. This is a crucial moment for the citizen mobilization against ACTA, which will have to resist the growing pressure that the copyright lobbies put on the Parliament. Beyond the rejection of ACTA, the whole EU copyright enforcement policy needs to be revised. Only a reform of copyright can protect once and for all fundamental rights online of EU citizens and push the online creative economy in a new direction, away from blind repression. Here is a state of play on the next steps of the mobilization in the European Parliament.

Online Copyright: EU Court of Justice Rules Out Private and Automatic Censorship

Paris, February 16th, 2012 – The European Court of Justice rendered another decision in defence of freedoms online. In the SABAM vs. Netlog case, it declares that forcing a hosting service to monitor and filter online content violates EU law. This is a crucial and timely ruling, just when initiatives such as ACTA and the revision of the IPRED directive aim to generalise private and automatic online censorship to enforce an outdated copyright regime.

Notice & Action: EU Commission Must Put Freedom of Expression First

Paris, January 11th, 2012 – Following a consultation held in late 2010, the European Commission just announced an action plan on the role of Internet actors in the policing of online content1. One key issue is that of “notice and takedown” measures, which are today implemented in total opacity at the expense of users' freedom of communication. As the global war on sharing rages, this announcement underlines the pressing need for citizen involvement in this crucial debate to better protect our freedoms online.

EU Court of Justice: Censorship in Name of Copyright Violates Fundamental Rights

Paris, November 24th, 2011 — The European Court of Justice just rendered a historic decision in the Scarlet Extended case, which is crucial for the future of rights and freedoms on the Internet. The Court ruled that forcing Internet service providers to monitor and censor their users' communications violated EU law, and in particular the right to freedom of communication. At a time of all-out offensive in the war against culture sharing online, this decision suggests that censorship measures requested by the entertainment industry are disproportionate means to enforce an outdated copyright regime. Policy-makers across Europe must take this decision into account by refusing new repressive schemes, such as the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), and engage in a much needed reform of copyright.

The Entire Internet Under Governmental Censorship In France?

Paris, June 15th, 2011 – Information website PC INpact revealed today a draft executive order which would give the French government the power to arbitrarily censor any content or service on the Net. The French government is furthering its policy to control the Internet, in complete disregard of citizens' rights and freedoms.

Make Your Voice Heard Against a "Clean Internet"

Paris, Sept. 4th 2012 - The European Commission is holding a consultation -ending on the 5th 11th of September- about "A clean and open Internet". Citizen input is critically needed to ensure that freedom of expression is protected, against the attempts of many lobbies to impose draconian repressive procedures to censor online content.

The Pirate Bay Decision, or the Political Persecution of Sharing

The Internet, November 27th 2010 - The decision to sentence the co-founders of The Pirate Bay to jail is both absurd and unfair. It illustrates how an obsolete copyright law and its indiscrimate application are harmful to society as a whole. Such an incomprehension of technological, economic and social realities should not mask the fact that this decision is above all political.

La Quadrature Answers EU consultation on "Online Services Directive"

La Quadrature du Net just sent its response to the EU Commission's consultation on the online services directive, also called the e-Commerce directive.

Download the document in PDF.

Comment La Quadrature's Draft Response to the Internet Directive Consultation

Just one day before the final deadline of the e-Commerce (or Internet directive) consultation, La Quadrature du Net publishes the draft of its response.

Why You Should Respond to the e-Commerce Consultation


There are only a few days left to answer the consultation. If you don't have enough time to answer the whole document, please consider responding at least to questions 56, 59, 60, 67, 69.
You can send your submission to markt-e-commerce@ec.europa.eu

The European Commission has launched a new public consultation on the future of the 2000 e-Commerce directive, which forms the basis of the Internet regulatory framework across the European Union. The reform of the e-Commerce directive is very important for rights and freedoms on the Internet, and all interested citizens and organizations should take the time to submit a response to the consultation by November 5th. By doing so, they can make sure that the democratizing potential of the Internet as well as the rule of law will be preserved.

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